The Future of Making Products: How Software-Maker Autodesk Intends To Disrupt Manufacturing With Intelligence…AND 3DP

Autodesk—one of the old-line tech companies with the greatest commercial opportunities in new-line 3DP—enjoys leadership that can talk. Better: take the stage and educate, authenticate, prognosticate…AND inspire.

Andrew Anagnost, Autodesk Senior VP, Industry Strategy & Marketing, does corporate strategy as stand-up comedy at MakerCon New York 2014 on 18 September 2014.

Andrew Anagnost, Autodesk Senior VP, Industry Strategy & Marketing, does corporate strategy as stand-up comedy at MakerCon New York 2014 on 18 September 2014.

In this last—inspiration—moves and compels with the vision Autodesk is seeing ahead. This is all while promising to lead individuals and industries to a new commercial and common-good reality. And—not surprisingly—a reality ADSK (the stock symbol Autodesk often uses for internal short-hand) will help them to fulfill.

I’ve marveled at the room-mesmerizing presentation craft of Autodesk’s Carl Bass—President & CEO—at other 3DP sector events. You can’t help but love Carl’s—you immediately want to be on a first name basis with this guy—aw-shucks / off the (rolled-up) cuff / wander-the-stage delivery of disruptive ideas. Carl’s opined concepts are the kind guaranteed to make short-sighted Wall Street analysts quail in fear of ADSK equity value.

Now, MakerCon Day 2 showcased yet another Autodesk senior spokesperson with stage chops and provocative revelations: Andrew Anagnost, Autodesk Senior VP, Industry Strategy & Marketing.

MakerCon was Maker Media, Inc.’s debut of its first “Maker Movement Conference” in New York City—more or less for “professional makers”—on 17 and 18 September. This was just before Maker Media’s “Flagship” World Maker Faire New York 2014. MakerCon consolidated a number of prior events around World Maker Faire—including the Hardware Innovation Workshop, a clinic on making Maker Spaces and Education Day.

So, on Day Two—compliments of Autodesk strategic positioning and clearly of a piece with a new corporate-storyline of serious intent—we laughed with light-footed Andrew Anagnost. His comedic schtick served to spotlight a profound juxtaposition. Andy (another at-ease first name!) casually walked about and talked about killing his company’s “children”—his established corporate products—before emerging assassins murdered them in the heartless marketplace.

A potpourri of 3D printed objects created using Autodesk software.

A potpourri of 3D-printed objects created using Autodesk software.

I’m circling back to comment in detail on THIS particular MakerCon presentation for key reasons.

I believe Andy Anagnost’s speech points the directions of major drivers of 3DP—including new engines of the company’s business model, its ubiquitous software and Autodesk (itself!). Thus, I’m convinced this Autodesk exec’s talk is of high importance for those who would understand where we’re going in 3DP—and who is leading us there.

SVP Andy framed his comments with the impact of digital tech, infinite computing power (“a supercomputer for everyone”) ubiquitous sensors, mechatronics—and the subsequent rise of human-complementing(??) robots.

As result, the workforce is becoming “nomadic” and/or working virtual. So, Autodesk is now convinced it needs to create software tools that can perform exceptionally in this disruptive new environment, too.

Tracking the advent of “smart everything,” ADSK is now addressing the intellectual elements of manufacturing. If our making systems are becoming more and more clever, we have to be cleverer still—in turn—about how we manage such powerful production assets. From both a commercial AND—implicitly—a common-good perspective.

The Local Motors "Strati" 3D-Printed, open-source, crowd-designed-winner car parked in front of MakerCon New York, NYSCI---"built" in 40 hours of realtime printing on a public exhibit-stand at the Intl Manufacturing Tech Show 2014 (in Chicago Sept 8 to 13, McCormick Place). Photo compliments J. E. Earle/Eventifier.

The Local Motors “Strati” 3D-Printed, open-source, crowd-designed-winner car parked in front of MakerCon New York, NYSCI—”built” in 40 hours of realtime printing on a public exhibit-stand at the Intl Manufacturing Tech Show 2014 (in Chicago Sept 8 to 13, McCormick Place). Photo compliments J. E. Earle/Eventifier.

Andy talked of “Fabless Manufacturing” of the (very near!) future where we will consolidate our making in shared facilities. He pointed to Local Motors—an Autodesk Spark-platform strategic partner—with that disruptive car-making startup’s dispersed production and “delivery” plan.

Underscoring this point—vividly and palpably—was Local Motor’s first-ever, open-sourced (and fully operational) 3D-printed runabout—the Strati—sitting at the front curb outside NYSCI’s central-building complex at the WMFaire-grounds in Flushing Meadows, Queens.

SVP Anagnost predicts high-performing societies around the world will begin to engage in a “Consumption Shift”—driven from the bottom up. This will start in the Golden Grassroots with high-margin buyers. These Discerners will insist on knowing—and thereby educating and modulating their intake—about the provenance, pluperfect performance specs and the post-usage arc of the products they buy and services they consume. How, where, when and by whom was it made/served? How long will it last? Is it toxic on any level? Is it sustainably disposable?

[These neo-manufacturing eventualities may begin to temper neo-classic capitalism---and its detrimental excesses---on a DIT (Do-It-Together) Regulation basis. If (corporately bought-and-sold) government’s continue to fail their responsibilities, empowered and interconnected citizens---with informed pocketbooks---may end up governing the producers on their own. With individual and collective acts of commercial soft-protest… –- LG]

Rear deck of the Local Motors "Strati" 3D-printed, open-source operational car parked outside MakerCon NY '14 at the NYSCI complex in Flushing Meadows, Queens; standing in the background is Jay Rogers, Local Motors' CEO & Co-Founder.

Rear deck of the Local Motors “Strati” 3D-printed, open-source operational car parked outside MakerCon NY ’14 at the NYSCI complex in Flushing Meadows, Queens; standing in the background is Jay Rogers, Local Motors’ CEO & Co-Founder.

These high-end expectations will diffuse through the other strata of every developed society. In consequence, these changing buying/consumption patterns will drive a fragmentation of demand. Challenging client/customers are going to insist on bespoke solutions—and 3DP will enable playing to such exigent stipulations. These new and different expectations will call for unprecedented customization regimes.

Andy called this vision “mass-produced customization.”

Adding another entire level of intelligence “aboard” or (abroad!), every product will automatically join the Internet of Things (IoT)—unless sequestered for different reasons. Along with other “ho-hum” presumptions, customers will assume hyper-local and/or cloud linking of even mundane products: a soon-to-be unexceptional expectation of Net connection.

From ADSK’s POV, the Internet of Everything (IoE) will require a “blending of hardware and software.” This synergy—the Venn Diagram “sweetspot” of hardware, software and customer exigencies—is apparently Autodesk’s strategic-positioning goal. Andy states “Things are going to be very intelligent”: they will be “SmartThings.” [And, OBTW, I’m confident ADSK intends to own as much of that Venn smart-geography as possible---all for YOUR betterment, of course…! --- LG]

According to SVP Anagnost, another Autodesk strategic vision is the Evergreen Product.

Major consumer systems (think your automobile or your washer-dryer) in your life will be iPhone-ized. Many consumer electronic products are regularly upgraded with new software releases. Because your car or washing machine’s digital intelligence will be wirelessly integrated into the IoE—and entirely empowered by software combined with protean hardware—it will “evolve” overtime. The system will present you with new software upgrades—with novel functionalities and value-adds—as your vendor strives to keep you connected. That’s both to the IoE and to his/her company.

Your delight is the provider’s goal. (And, sometimes it will seem perfectly appropriate for your vendor to charge you for the Next Rev.)

Tesla Motors—one of the two most innovative auto makers on the planet (the other is Local Motors)—is already promising that “we’re going to make the [Tesla] car better [on a current customer-specific basis] over your time of ownership.” And—you guessed it—Autodesk is ALSO a strategic partner of Tesla…strange how that seems to be working…!

To move the company’s agenda ahead as rapidly as possible, Andy of ADSK is out to create a “3D literate consumer class”—and an integrated 3DP ecosystem for that group to play in.

Autodesk's (yet to be named or released) STL, semi-pro, desktop 3D Printer: a will-be working and for-sale "proof of concept" to demo the new ADSK Spark software suite---as much as a market-targeted hardware launch.

Autodesk’s (yet to be named or released) STL, semi-pro, desktop 3D Printer: a will-be working and for-sale “proof of concept” to demo the new ADSK Spark software suite—as much as a market-targeted hardware launch.

Primary elements of this “literacy” strategy include free software products for schools and universities; new ancillary “tools” like Fusion 360, cloud-based CAD/CAM for collaborative development and 3DP output; the free “Spark,” open-source, 3D-printing software platform (as an operating system to drive many varieties of 3D printers); and the company’s own ADSK 3D printer.

These last two key elements are likely to be further profiled—and the no-name printer officially debuted(??)—at the “Inside 3D Printing Santa Clara” Conference and Expo on 21 to 23 October.

Andy opined that “Spark would be the PostScript of the [3DP] future.” (For those of you who missed the desktop-printing {DTP} revolution—that’s 2D laser-printing: think Apple’s prime-mover LaserWriter—of 30 years ago, PostScript was the “universal” laser-printer application that empowered that revolution across printer platforms.)

Buttressing these Autodesk senior-management vectors, Carl Bass was quoted in May as saying, “I think we’re really at the beginning of a new way of making stuff—and [at Autodesk] we’re just trying to kickstart it.”

Carl Bass, President & CEO of Autodesk, presenting his Keynote at "Inside 3D Printing" at the Javits Center, NYC, on 4 April 2014.

Carl Bass, President & CEO of Autodesk, presenting his Keynote at “Inside 3D Printing” at the Javits Center, NYC, on 4 April 2014.

At MakerCon in New York, Andy Anagnost ended his presentation “provocations” by stating that executive/strategists at ADSK were out to “kill their [own Autodesk product] children with new ecosystems.” He concluded emphatically with: “we WILL be the SELF-disruptor!”

C’mon Back!

LAND

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Email, HOME, NY3DPWeek, Views | Leave a comment

MakerCon—New “Big Tent” Conference For Makers—Debuts In New York City With 3DP-Related Roll-Outs

Maker Media, Inc. (MM) continues to coalesce new communities from its “Maker Movement”—a booming phenomenon that it both helped to birth and continues to support. Now, MM is reworking its offerings again—in response to the opportunities afforded by the explosive growth of its Maker Faire “franchise.”

MakerCon New York 2014 debuted in the week prior to the 5th Annual World Maker Faire NY '14.

MakerCon New York 2014 debuted in the week prior to the 5th Annual World Maker Faire NY ’14.

Just a few months ago, Maker Media announced that it had reached the milestone of 100 Maker Faires-worldwide. Today, Dale Dougherty, CEO of Maker Media, personally announced MM will debut 35 new Faires of various sizes in THIS year. This includes another “flagship” event in London in 2015.

Why should those in 3DP commerce or common-good care about the Maker Movement? Because—as I discovered in my interviews of Maker Media execs in July—fully one third of Maker activity at World Maker Faire New York 2014 will be driven by 3DP in one form or another. And, the action at MakerCon NY 2014 buttresses the trend to even greater mutual and aligned growth in this natural integration of Makers and 3DP.

3DP is booming. The Maker Movement—as confirmed by Maker Faire ecosystem, global hyper-expansion—is booming. The two vectors are now synergistic.

Previously, MM had held a hardware innovation event for Maker “pros”—those building businesses in Maker disciplines—in the official “Weeks” before its two flagship Maker Faires in San Francisco and New York. In addition, Maker Media presented ancillary workshops on building, marketing and managing Makerspaces. In the “Weeks,” MM also held “education days” for teachers interested in Making as a platform for programs—from STEM-based curricula to afterschool to fostering young makers.

MakerCon Logo RocketNow, Maker Media has amalgamated all of these Maker events under a two-day, over-arching event that the company is calling “MakerCon”—short for Maker Movement Conference. MM rolled out the first MakerCon at Maker Faire Bay Area 2014 in May. The company is now presenting its second here in New York City at World Maker Faire Week on 17 and 18 September.

Dale Dougherty—as MakerCon ”Master of Ceremonies”—opened the new Maker get-together with these cogent remarks: ”MakerCon is now an umbrella event. In the past [in the week prior to our flagship Faires], we focused on hardware innovation—mostly for the ”pro” Makers. BUT something bigger was happening. That’s why we created MakerCon. [To celebrate the broader Maker Movement drive] to do things that come out of our own heads and share with others. MakerCon is also about civic and education impacts: on and for the community.

“Last wkend there were 10 Maker Faires in America: over 135 this year. We’re no longer just the business of Making and the tools, BUT the civic aspects. And, we have the ambition to [help] create the leaders of the Maker Movement. Something that is powerful and important.”

In prior comments, Dale had foreshadowed his MakerCon intro with these supporting ideas: “ The Maker Movement is providing new insights into local and global manufacturing, design, workforce development, education and creative culture. We are excited by the growth of makerspaces in communities, in a variety of settings from libraries and schools to city centers and in industry. National and local government leaders are trying to understand how to support the growth of the Maker Movement. Even large corporations are trying to figure out how the Maker Movement impacts their interactions with customers and the kinds of products they develop.”

In the following, Day-One morning sessions, MakerCon quickly proved that it was suddenly the place to be, be seen and be active in rolling out Maker/3DP ideas, relationships and products.

John Kavanagh, President of Dremel, rolled out the company's first foray into 3DP with its innovative Idea Builder desktop 3D Printer.

John Kavanagh, President of Dremel, rolled out the company’s first foray into 3DP with its innovative “Idea Builder” desktop 3D Printer.

The President of famous, old-line, 80-year-old Dremel Tools (which could be called the Makers’ “Pocket Machine Shop”) took the stage and introduced his company’s debut entry in the hyper-competitive world of desktop 3D printers. John Kavanagh presented the “Dremel 3D Idea Builder,” which “builds on the [Dremel] legacy of easy-to-use tools” with a “comprehensive 3D printing ecosystem empowering a new generation of makers to build revolutionary projects for creative and functional purposes.”

According to Dremel, the Idea Builder features easy-to-use functionality, full-featured tools and family and environmental friendliness—all at an aggressive $999 MSRP and availability at selected Home Depot stores in November. Looks like a homerun off the bat.

(See 3DPI’s in-depth and incisive Dremel companion piece by Editor Rachel Park.)

And, the new MakerCon New York was Dremel’s debut venue—reinforcing the alignment of Making and 3DP.

C’mon Back!

LAND

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Email, HOME, NY3DPWeek, Views | Leave a comment

3DP4E Producing (Physical! Printed!! Non-3DP’d!!!) Poster Series To Showcase 3DP…

In the whiteout of our 3D-Printing “TMI” blizzard, all of us are looking for the hand-raised letterpress signals against the featureless noise of petabyte-gray backgrounds.

So, if you’re in the business of galvanizing 3DP awareness, exciting attention, educating ignorance and focusing the white-hot beam of change through the fog of the future, how would YOU illuminate the way forward for our Additive Manufacturing industry?

3DP4E's "3DP'd Fashion" Poster: first in a series of traditionally printed, four-color, frame-able posters celebrating the new worlds of 3D Printing as "collectable" art.

3DP4E’s “3DP’d Fashion” Poster: first in a series of traditionally printed, four-color, frame-able posters celebrating the new worlds of 3D Printing as “collectable” art.

Well, you might lead by emulating 3DP4E.com (“3D Printing For Everyone”) of New York City. (The folks who just brought you “3D Printing and Digital Fabrication Resource eBook” [on which I’ve reported here on 3DPI] and also presents a Beginner’s Guide online…among other curated, categorized and creative Web-based paths to 3DP knowledge). You’d print up a poster—yep, four-color inks on heavy, clay-coated paper. A wall-mounted statement: tangible, tactile, tackable…and rare. Decidedly—and delightfully—NOT digital.

That is by deploying the counterintuitive, showcasing the retro and shining the brass of steampunk sensibility for your geek/glam techreative-audience members. (I consider this last to be another synonym for Brooklynites in 3DP…) And, that other—often dumbfounded—multitude that diligently resists the doom of playing eternal catch-up with the accelerating leading edge. These are the folks who need 3DP knowledge most: the clients and customers and deep community a-building via 3DP4E interest and leadership.

This new company—as I’ve reported—“has decided to make it easier for 3DP newbies and the uninitiated (a VERY large population of wannabes) to access the knowledge bases of our booming 3DP industry.”

3DP4E's Logo Suite--3D Printing Around The World?

3DP4E’s Logo Suite–3D Printing Around The World?

As part of its mission, 3DP4E has decided to start showcasing the work of innovative 3DP-driven artists, designers and creative makers in different disciplines by—in effect—putting “group shows” on large-scale printed posters. 3DP4E intends to cycle through most important current 3DP segments via spotlighting the most important players—starting with Fashion. (Appropriate for 3DP4E’s hometown: one of the planet’s most important clusters of the worldwide Fashion industry.)

As 3DP4E describes it: “The first in…[our poster] series focuses on the innovative work done in the Fashion world, and features designers such as Francis Bitonti, Catherine Wales and Nervous Systems. These designers push the boundaries of digital fabrication within the world of fashion.”

Ron Rose, CEO of 3DP4E.

Ron Rose, CEO of 3DP4E.

“These posters are designed to look good in Makerspaces and Fabrication Labs, and to look beautiful as framed art in one’s home,” says Ron Rose, the CEO of 3DP4E. “Stay tuned for next poster in our series—3D Art.”

Perhaps as an antidote to accusations of quixotic Luddite leanings, poster-maker 3DP4E has positioned the poster itself as a front end to the startup’s larger mission as “a dynamic [3DP] information hub.” A QR Code printed on the poster enables viewers to link to “a dedicated page on 3DP4E’s website with pictures, descriptions, videos and articles on the designs.” Plus, anyone intrigued by the company’s choice of 3DP-empowered designers can learn more about their work on 3DP4E’S 3DP Fashion poster by going to: www.3dp4e.com/posters/3d-fashion.

Some of the 3DP4E Team in action at their Manhattan offices: (from left) Ron Rose, Larry Adames & Matt Manuele.

Some of the 3DP4E Team in action at their Manhattan offices: (from left) Ron Rose, Larry Adames & Matt Manuele.

Want to get your own look at 3DP4E’s “3DP’d Fashion” poster? Or, claim one for free? Attend World Maker Faire New York 2014 on September 20th and 21st and visit 3DP4E’s booth. The startup will be giving away posters to the first 100 people dropping by on the Faire’s Saturday and Sunday.

Going to miss the Faire? 3DP4E’s first poster is also available as a free download on its site and can be accessed directly at: www.3dp4e.com/posters. 

C’mon Back!

LAND

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Email, HOME, NY3DPWeek, Views | Leave a comment