“HCx3DP Meetup NY” Report: Our Meetup (Event #2) Delivers Again…Despite The Most Extensive Subway Outage Of The Year Simultaneous With Our Gathering!!

As promised, we assembled another terrific “knowledge” environment for our “HCx3DP New York” (Healthcare Multiplied By 3D Printing) Community members to enjoy—and profit from—via our second “HCx3DP Meetup NY” event. Our burgeoning Group gathered again last Thursday evening (11 December) at NYU-Poly’s illustrious 137 Varick Street Incubator in SoHo West. Not even the systemic failure of the New York Subway could keep us from educating, connecting and inspiring our new and growing Community of “HCx3DP Synergists”—assembled (and intrepid!) Attendees, Experts and Organizer Team ALL…

Land Grant, Founder/Publisher, 3DP Media & Organizer, HCx3DP Meetup New York.

Land Grant, Founder/Publisher, 3DP Media & Organizer, HCx3DP Meetup New York, speaking on the NYC Health Business Leaders’ panel about Healthcare & 3DP, at Cooley (Cooley Health Practice)  LLP, Manhattan, 17 June 2014.

As those Readers who have joined-in either of our first two HCx3DP Meetups can attest, we’ve devised an effective agenda for the furtherance of our new Community via physical get-togethers.

My goal—at the start of our overarching “HCx3DP New York” Campaign of “3Cs” (Community to Conference to Cluster)—has been to build a novel and powerful Community of connected and coalesced parties and players.  We’re helping aggregate this Team—around an abiding and mutual-interest in the important commercial and common-good initiatives it can create—at the intersection of Healthcare and 3D Printing in New York City.

Our ultimate goal is to foster a new HCx3DP Ecosystem—a novel industrial-segment Cluster headquartered in the City—that we recognized early-on and are rapidly buttressing. New York City is positioned to dominate the world in Healthcare Multiplied By 3D Printing. Our targeted success—via our HCx3DP New York Campaign—will come in helping to add well-paying, sustainable Middle-Class jobs to the current population of 665,000 workers (bedpans to brain-surgery) in NYC Healthcare.

As I suggested earlier in this post, we’re refining our winning HCx3DP Meetup Agenda for an enriching meeting—to assure that our Meetup attendees get the max from the moment.

Thus, December’s agenda included:

  1. 3D Printing Hands-On & Demos (by our fellow Meetup “Learn 3D Printing – Brooklyn”);
  2. Audience self-intros;
  3. The latest in my on-going series from our “HCx3DP Album of Innovation;”
  4. An “panel” of selected Experts on diverse HCx3DP topics of common interest;
  5. Audience suggestions for Meetup and Community betterment (e.g., panel topics, experts to recruit, directions we might go, etc.).
  6. Networking | networking | networking with light refreshments.

Our Experts’ Topic for our 11 December HCx3DP Meetup was “Eclectic Points of  View in HCx3DP.” This follows on our “Big Tent” approach to HCx3DP-Community building—because it garners creativity synergies from diverse sources…

We enticed four Experts to join-in to educate our audience on 11 December. They were:

Bradley Rothenberg — Innovating New Materials Via 3DP:  Co-Founder of Bradley Rothenberg Studio in NYC; initially focused on fashion and apparel, BRS’s material and fabric breakthrough designs are beginning to find applications in novel Healthcare and industrial solutions—“making 3D printed parts better through…customization of micro-structures.” 

Elena Ovaitt Weiss — Health Visualized Via Infographics: 
Founder, Ovaitt Health Media, NYC; clarifying complexity, accelerating understanding and empowering decision-making — at the intersection of HC & 3DP — with case studies.  

Charles Driza IV — “Learn 3D Printing – Brooklyn” Meetup: Co-Organizer; NYC. Operating room by day [surgical robot support-team leader] and 3D printing by night. My goal is printing tools for use in the O.R. and having a blast doing it.  

Derek Mathers (virtual appearance) — Expert on 3D Printing & Injection Molding in Healthcare: Business Development Manager, Worrell Design Inc., Minneapolis, MN; one of the leading industrial-design firms in medical devices, Worrell has just introduced “3D IM,” an innovative system for 3DP-modulated injection molding — a disruptive HCx3DP offering that promises to slash both time to market and medical-device costs. 

So, our Organizer Team was in place and prepared at NYU-Poly’s Incubator in SoHo West for our RSVP’s (16 “HCx3DP Synergists”), Experts and “walk-ons.” Despite the competition from the parties and revels of the Celebratory Season, we were confident—via promotion and personal outreach—that we’d enjoy a good turnout.

Well, 6:30 PM—Start Time!—arrived BUT no one else had or did… It wasn’t until 6:45 that the first “Synergist” straggled in—and we learned from them of the New York Subway outage. Yowza! as we say in Brooklyn…

[Despite the travails, we ended up with three of our four planned Experts, a good turn out (walk-ons helped) and a terrific presentation set for everyone who made it to the Incubator. I'm particularly interested to review two of our Expert talks for you. Which I will do later this morning...]

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

 

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Our “HCx3DP New York” Campaign Picks Up Speed: “3Cs” Plan—Community to Conference to Cluster—Builds Community w/ 2nd “HCx3DP Meetup NY” Event!

HCx3DP MUp NYCome join in THIS Thursday evening, 11 December, 6:30 to 8:30 PM, in the “Think Tank” Event Space at the illustrious NYU-Poly Incubator at 137 Varick Street, 2nd Floor,  in Hudson Square (SoHo West) in Lower Manhattan. Here’s the complete description of our HCx3DP Meetup New York Event:

Highlight: we will have FOUR HCx3DP Experts on hand to enrich your evening—and your future thinking—about the fertile intersection of Healthcare and 3D Printing. Please see our Agenda below…

Become part of our burgeoning HCx3DP New York Meetup Community (it’s FREE) and RSVP for our Thursday evening Meetup event ($20 per “HCx3DP Synergist”).

+++ 

Welcome HCx3DP Synergist! 

(…present or prospective…)

Land Grant, Publisher/Editor/Organizer, 3DP Media | NYC3DP.com | HCx3DP New York

Land Grant, Publisher/Editor/Organizer, 3DP Media | NYC3DP.com | HCx3DP New York

Our “HCx3DP New York” Meetup—HCx3DP stands for “Healthcare Multiplied by 3D Printing”—is designed to help grow a community of Metro NYC “HCx3DP Synergists.” Together, we will strive to discover, learn, exchange and advance personal, commercial and common-good knowledge about the new, important and valuable at the exciting and empowering intersection of HC & 3DP in our New York City.

For further background on our Meetup directions (and planned “HCx3DP Ecosystem”), link to my Blog post of 27 October: HCx3DP New York: The Launch of ‘Healthcare Multiplied By 3D Printing’ in the Capital of Healthcare & 3DP…” For an informal overview of the enriching action at our 12 November Meetup (our debut get-together!), please link to my 17 November post: Our New HCx3DP Initiative…Bettering NYC’s Health Via Three “Cs”: Community to Conference to Cluster!

Building on our kick-off momentum of 12 November, we’ve scheduled our next Meetup for Thursday, 11 December, in the evening from 6:30 to 8:30 PM. Our NEXT venue is the “Think Tank” Event Space in NYU-Poly’s well-known, leading-edge, tech-based Incubator at 137 Varick Street (2nd Floor) in Hudson Square (otherwise known as SoHo West!) in Manhattan. (A very appreciative “thank you!” to the generous sponsorship of NYU and Steve Kuyan, Associate Director, Incubator & Entrepreneurial Initiatives at NYU’s Polytechnic School of Engineering.)

Hey, HCx3DP Community Members and Friends, if you’ve an appropriate event venue in mind—for January 2015 or further future—please lemme know ASAP! Key venue virtues include host co-aligned interests, gratis availability and reasonable access by public transportation.

We’re also working hard to keep improving on our first Meetup success. (An on-going challenge: I’ve received several emails of “congrats” from our attendees: I’m red-faced but VERY pleased.) Will evolve our agendas as we build value for our audiences—YOU! December 11 will have some similar features—because they worked well—to our Debut in November. December’s Agenda includes:

  1. 3D Printing Hands-On & Demos (by our fellow Meetup “Learn 3D Printing – Brooklyn”);
  2. Audience self-intros;
  3. The latest in my on-going series from our “HCx3DP Album of Innovation;”
  4. An informal panel of experts on topics of common interest;
  5. Audience suggestions for Meetup and Community betterment (e.g., panel topics, experts to recruit, directions we might go, etc.).
  6. Networking | networking | networking with light refreshments.

C’mon Back here to see our updates…

Best!

LAND
, Group Organizer

+++

Our Experts’ Topic for our 11 December HCx3DP Meetup-Event: 

Eclectic POVs In HCx3DP: Our “Big Tent” Approach To HCx3DP-Community Building Garners Creativity Synergies From Diverse Sources…

+++

Your “Take-Aways”—From Our 11 December HCx3DP Meetup—Will Stem From These Agenda Items:

(1)   Agenda Item: greetings and orientation to “HCx3DP New York’s” structure, operating concepts & goals by me, Organizer Land Grant;

>> Take-Away: An operational understanding “HCx3DP New York” and its value to you, plus my self-intro and my plans to assure a rich and compelling HCx3DP environment for Members and attendees;

(2)   Agenda Item: informal attendee self-intros, sharing of interests & expectations;

>> Take-Away: A personal view of fellow HCx3DP members and attendees, their topics of concentration and what they hope to get from their membership/attendance;

(3)   Agenda Item: my short A/V presentation (a continually updated “work in progress”) on the latest developments in HCx3DP;

>> Take-Away: A visual “mental picture” with bullets, annotations and comments profiling the latest developments in HCx3DP technology and solutions;

(4)  Agenda Item: a very-informal “panel” discussion with experts on some of the newest HCx3DP participants, innovations, creative techniques and fertile cross-overs at the exciting intersection of Healthcare and 3DP. followed by Q&A. Here are our projected panel participants:

Bradley Rothenberg — Innovating New Materials Via 3DP:  Co-Founder of Bradley Rothenberg Studio in NYC; initially focused on fashion and apparel, BRS’s material and fabric breakthrough designs are beginning to find applications in novel Healthcare and industrial solutions—“making 3D printed parts better through…customization of micro-structures.” (Confirmed.)

Elena Ovaitt Weiss — Health Visualized Via Infographics: 
Founder, Ovaitt Health Media, NYC; clarifying complexity, accelerating understanding and empowering decision-making — at the intersection of HC & 3DP — with case studies. (Confirmed.) 

Charles Driza IV— “Learn 3D Printing – Brooklyn” Meetup. Co-Organizer; NYC. Operating room by day [surgical robot support-team leader] and 3D printing by night. My goal is printing tools for use in the O.R. and having a blast doing it. (Confirmed.) 

Derek Mathers (virtual appearance) — Expert on 3D Printing & Injection Molding in Healthcare: Business Development Manager, Worrell Design Inc., Minneapolis, MN; one of the leading industrial-design firms in medical devices, Worrell has just introduced “3D IM,” an innovative system for 3DP-modulated injection molding — a disruptive HCx3DP offering that promises to slash both time to market and medical-device costs. (Confirmed.)

>> Take-Away: An expert-guided appreciation for several distinct branches of  Healthcare that will compel your new thinking aout HCx3DP.

(5)   Agenda Item: a side-bar demo of 3D printing for the uninitiated by the Organizers of the Meetup “Learn 3D Printing – Brooklyn;”

>> Take-Away: A hands-on, up-close orientation around actual 3DP-desktop Additive Manufacturing, informed by free-form Q&A during demos and commentary.

(6)   Agenda Item: ample time for networking and congenial cross-connecting (plus light refreshments).

+++

In this and future meetups, we will seek to explore such topics (and those YOU suggest) as:

• 3DP-Empowered Personalized Healthcare;

• DIY/DIT Robo-Hands Movement;

• DIY/DIT Synthetic-Biology Labs;

• DIY/DIT Medicine: Maker Nurses;

• 3DP’d Non-Invasive ExoSolutions;

• Patient-Controlled Robotic Exoskeletons;

• Regenerative Orthopedic Medicine;

• 3DP’d Endodontia & Orthodontia;

• 3DP’d BioComposite Medical Devices;

• 3DP’d Medical-Model Planned Surgery;

• Bioprinted Replacement Soft Tissues & Organs;

• Drug Development Via 3DP’d Tissues;

• FDA Tissue-Toxicity Testing;

• Health-Promoting 3DP’d Nutrition;

• Space-Modulated Synthetic Biology; and

• So Much More In Daily Development…

+++

So, join us—on the evening of Thursday, 11 December—to enjoy a deep dive into the booming HC sector of 3DP. Help us continue the Team-building of our Community of  “HCx3DP Synergists!”

I look forward to “meeting up” with you…

LAND

Land Grant

3DP Journalist & “HCx3DP New York” Organizer
3DP Media | NYC3DP.com | 3DPI Ltd.

 

 

 

 

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Health By (3DP) Design: Worrell Helps Span The Gap Between Patient-Generic & Patient-Specific With New “3D IM” (3D-Printed Injection Molding) Solutions

Everyone’s health is his or her own. Everyone’s disease belongs to us all. Health is license; disease is liability…a very-personal liability that impacts humans as an individual, a family, a community, a society.

Bob Worrell (left), Founder & Chairman and Kai Worrell, CEO, Worrell Design, displaying "3D IM" Injection Molding Fixtures on Worrell production floor.

Bob Worrell (left), Founder & Chairman and Kai Worrell, CEO, Worrell Design, displaying “3D IM” Injection Molding Fixtures on Worrell production floor. The medical device itself is a wireless monitor designed to measure contractions and heart rates for women in labor.

Now, Worrell Design Inc. is rolling out new means to reduce those “liabilities” and extend those “licenses”—patient by patient. Worrell—a family-owned and operated business—has established itself as perhaps the most prominent industrial design firm working in the healthcare sector. Regardless—with roll-outs like its just-introduced “3D IM” (3D-Printed Injection Molding) system in close collaboration with leading 3D-printer manufacturer Stratasys Ltd.—the firm is proving itself to be the most innovative. And—philosophically—among the most human-centric.

As the Additive Manufacturing cognoscenti understand, 3DP technology continues to accelerate in development at an ever-increasing rate. Many traditional manufacturers are still struggling to grasp the commercial implications. Inherently conservative segments—like medical-device makers, constrained by FDA regulators—have been particularly slow in adopting what should look like very-compelling 3DP solutions.

On 30 October, separate sector-leaders Stratasys (3D printers) and Worrell (medical-device design)—near geographic neighbors in metropolitan Minneapolis, MN—proclaimed their collaboration around educating and accessing the medical-device marketplace. Their disruptive tool of choice is new 3DP innovation in the long-established, industrial processes of injection molding. As Stratasys states, “Worrell slashes lead times by a game-changing 95% in comparison to traditional tooling, with costs plummeting 70%.” This while mitigating risk for both practitioner and device manufacturer—via very-early feedback and quick iteration in the product-development cycle.

Use the following link for an easy-to-read PDF of Worrell's "3D IM" Infographic ("3D Printed Injection Molds: Accelerationg Product Development"): http://nyc3dp.com/?p=3202.

Use the following link for an easy-to-read PDF of Worrell’s “3D IM” Infographic (“3D Printed Injection Molds: Accelerationg Product Development”): http://nyc3dp.com/?p=3202. This Infographic explains the 3D printing and injection molding process and its benefits as modulated by “3D IM.”

By dint of its dramatic cost reductions, Worrell’s 3D IM will also democratize medical device development. Based on a 2010 study by a Stanford University team—entitled “FDA Impact on U.S. Medical Technology Innovation”—the average cost to bring a high-risk Class III device to market is $94 million. For a Class II device, it is $31 million. 3D IM 3D-printed injection molds empower prototype development—using final production materials—for a fraction of the cost. This process can deliver actual finished parts in a matter of days—compared to the typical eight-week lead-time associated with traditional tooling processes.

In human terms, what is the potential value of this saved time? Ultimately, it is saved lives. Worrell’s innovative 3D IM production system will help get life-saving medical devices to market quicker.

To add perspective to that statement, consider this hypothetical case. For millions of people with severe allergies, ordinary foods and everyday events—such as a bee sting—are life-threatening emergencies. The FDA (in “Food Allergies: What You Need to Know”) estimates that anaphylaxis to food in the U.S. results in 30,000 emergency room visits, 2,000 hospitalizations and 150 deaths each year.

Anaphylaxis can be fatal within minutes. So, fast and effective emergency-medical intervention by the untrained is crucial. An at-hand drug injector—capable of immediately delivering a life-saving dose of the drug epinephrine—can mean the difference between survival and death for allergy sufferers.

Worrell worked with Intelliject (recently renamed Kaleo) to redesign the epinephrine pen. Together, they created a user-friendly, epinephrine delivery system the size and shape of a credit card. At the time of the project, 3D IM was not available to rapid-prototype the product. This meant that longer, traditional tooling methods had to be used to develop the device.

Worrell’s 3D IM would have accelerated the product development process, bringing the device to market sooner. If this device had rolled-out just two months sooner—as a result of the delivery-accelerating 3D IM process—approximately 5,000 emergency room visits, 333 hospitalizations and 25 deaths might have been avoided.

Worrell—with offices in Minneapolis, MN and Shanghai, China—is continuing to buttress its reputation for HC product research, design, development, branding and integrated business-success strategy. The growing list of Worrell’s blue-ribbon/blue-chip, healthcare-industry clients includes Medtronic, Becton Dickenson, Amgen, Johnson & Johnson, Covidien and Thoratec.

Just as important—perhaps more so long-term—is Worrell’s championing of design-modulated solutions for the world’s critical human-health issues. As a thought-leader around people and planet needs, the company has helped to inspire, idea-seed and support many innovating health-technology and medical-device startups. These entrepreneurial firms are introducing products that are redefining the healthcare industry globally.

Even with small parts, 3D IM creates precise prototypes that can be used for testing.

Even with small parts, 3D IM creates precise prototypes that can be used for testing.

Speaking directly to the Worrell “solution engine” of design modulation for healthcare innovations, McKinsey & Company—arguably the world’s most famous business-consulting firm—released a resonant study entitled “Design to value in medical devices” in 2010.

In its study, McKinsey’s team addresses the healthcare-provider fall-out from the worldwide Great Recession and continued weakness in almost every economy globally. That fall-out is the inability of typical medical-device customers—developed or emerging market-based—to continue to afford high-margin, feature-rich and/or bleeding-edge-tech devices.

McKinsey states that medical device companies need product-design regimens that incorporate new tools and novel thinking. “In particular, they need to be able to do two things effectively. First, they must find ways to understand exactly which product features their customers need and, critically, how much they are willing to pay for them.”

McKinsey—like all successful consulting houses working for the Fortune 100—has created a brand-package and managerial mantra to showcase their whole suite of interlocking, actionable concepts. Voila: McKinsey’s “Design to Value” or DtV.

McKinsey’s DtV system sounds a lot like an older Producer/Client regime: the Value Proposition build. But, regardless of the terminology, an innovative hybrid-capabilities firm like Worrell is the obvious engine to drive a conceptual-frame like DtV to reality in the marketplace. Worrell’s “Health By (3DP) Design”—evidenced via a disruptive system like its 3D IM—changes McKinsey’s “givens” by drastically altering the number-assumptions around medical devices. Further, Worrell is already practicing novel and sophisticated field study via Ethnographic Research (see below). Plus, Worrell addresses time-to-market as the key multivariate element in its own 3d IM mix.

In 2010, McKinsey made no mention of 3DP in its “DtV in Medical Devices” debut. In the five years since McKinsey developed DtV, the famous consultancy has indeed discovered 3DP. And, Worrell may be the perfect, packaged solution for the delivery of many of McKinsey’s DtV tenets.

Using a Stratasys PolyJet printer and an injection molding press, Worrell can create production-level parts in hours.

Using a Stratasys PolyJet printer and an injection molding press, Worrell can create production-level parts in hours.

Since the gestation of humanity, each ill person has had to accept the generic answers to their disease. For most of our common history, that is all our crude “medical science” could afford us at the time of healing need. A kind of undifferentiated hope—usually dashed. Only the gentling comfort of palliative care—the concerned touch and stroke and whispered “there there” of the nurse laying on soft hand and voice—could tender the hurt…a little.

The all-too-revealing word—or state—of “patient” described both halves of the bedside equation. Individual person—doctor, nurse, hospice care-giver—to individual person was as patient-specific as our ignorant healthcare system could enable. The body had to mostly cure itself—“PATIENT heal thyself”— or s/he didn’t and died.

These days, physicians CAN indeed heal. In fact, they’re expected to. Even to the modern anticipation that the doctor will cure death itself—or at least fend it off for the foreseeable (personal) future.

Kai Worrell, CEO of his family’s eponymous firm, thinks that medicine has now become too physician-centric. As a human stance, corporate mission AND most-effective, long-term business strategy, Kai wants to put “patient needs first”—once again. This would be a canny drive to redress what Worrell sees as an unhealthy imbalance in power and perspective. CEO Worrell goes on to state, “Our focus is on improving the provision of care [to the individual] through empathy and technology.”

“Empathy” is not the typical watchword of hard-nosed business leaders. This is despite the fact that every client who signs a purchase order, or customer who pulls out a credit card, has made a personal or emotional decision to purchase something. That decision is mostly based on a relationship with the seller, the product or the expectation. The most certain basis of that relationship IS empathy.

Worrell Design invests scientific method and professional study in human relationships in its healthcare-marketplace environment. Consonant with its humanistic basis for its design and technology decisions, the company engages in high-caliber, field-grounded ethnographic research. To design effective, tech-driven people-solutions in healthcare, Worrell studies human groups in holistic response to the complex healthcare environments in question. E.g., patients in hospitals interacting with medical devices.

Kai’s leadership includes oversight of Worrell’s Ethnographic Research function—an innovation in operational design-management. Worrell researchers conduct user-studies in hospitals, clinics, and patient’s homes in developed and emerging markets around the world. From research proceeds, CEO Worrell also oversees the company’s continued efforts in offering the best device development processes, which now include the new 3D IM 3D-printed tooling and injection-molding capabilities.

As Kai Worrell says, “Our ethnographic methods are a hybrid between anthropology and investigative journalism.” By combining ethnographic research methods with a designer’s arsenal of ideation and visualization tools, Worrell “sheds light on unmet, often unspoken needs, translating these into strategic insights and opportunities. We call it ‘Pivotal Thinking’—a 360º approach to exploring and extrapolating insights from all angles while staying grounded in the stated problem.”

Worrell’s injection molding technician removes a polycarbonate part from a 3D printed injection mold.

Worrell’s injection molding technician removes a polycarbonate part from a 3D printed injection mold.

Forward-looking Worrell is also “designing-in” innovations in other ancillary fields around its core medical-devices segment:

(1) Care Delivery—
This includes the larger issues of successful, integrated patient Care Delivery driven by the medical-devices it designs.

(2) Systems & Services—
To present effective, over-arching solutions, the company has assured its ethnographic research and design-strategy expertise applies as much to Systems and Services as it does to individual products.

(3) Wireless Health—
Worrell is deeply engaged in Wireless Health via active participation in the wireless life-science industry; the firm is a sponsor of the seminal, eight-year-old “Body Computing Conference” at the University of Southern California.

(4) Wellness —
Finally, Worrell advocates for proactive Wellness as the ultimate “cure” for disease. Treating illnesses is a reactive stance that wastes resources of every kind on a grand scale—not the least of which is the life-enjoying value of each individual’s natural good-health “resource.” The company is designing solutions to prevent illness and promote wellness, from functional foods to consumer technology.

For decades, practically the only patient-specific offering in the medical-device cabinet was the plaster cast. Now—in just the last few years—3DP has been begun to provide more and more solutions in the form of individual patient-tailored exo-devices and implantables

Worrell Design’s new 3D IM—an innovation in 3D-printed injection molding— delivers health by (3DP) design. Its novel deliverables are small-batch prototyping and final-product runs of 10 to 200 units. Thus, Worrell is helping span the gap between patient-generic and patient-specific—through new solutions at the sweetspot of intersecting 3DP and injection molding.

C’mon Back!

LAND

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