More On Education Engining The “How-To” Of 3DP Implementation: Empowering Your Leap Up The Learning Curve of 3D Printing/DigiFab Understanding…

The Demand For A Practical Education In 3DP Is Accelerating With The Soaring Interest In Our Transformative Technology: Meeting That Demand Will Require Novel Thinking About How To Teach, Tutor & Train In New Ways To Match New Paradigms & New Opportunities…

A Desire Line Demonstrated: Forget the institutional path, what do the people want, need and do...?! Thanks to "Brooklynite on the Ice" (antarcticiana.blogspot.com) and I quote: "...committed by the masses; a pure expression of democratic will, the people manifestly having voted with their feet..." Here is wayfaring as a metaphor for DIY/DIT education in 3DP tech.

A Desire Line Demonstrated: Forget the institutional path, what do the people want, need and do…?! Thanks to “Brooklynite on the Ice” (antarcticiana.blogspot.com) and I quote: “…committed by the masses; a pure expression of democratic will, the people manifestly having voted with their feet…” Here is wayfaring as a metaphor for DIY/DIT education in 3DP tech.

In recent posts, I’ve started outlining how I think “i3E” is likely to drive 3DP implementation. (Our i3E mantra stands for Inspiration, Education, Entrepreneurship & Economic development.)

The most important driver here at the start of the process—singularly and socially—is education. Teaching the tech will make all the difference in the “how-to” of integrating 3DP into our commercial and common-good betterment—especially at our “action unit” of the local community.

In my last post on this topic, I “bulleted” a number of concepts in the “teaching of” at our 3DP Revolution—the new and necessary education in how-to implement 3DP in our real world. Here is a repeat of that list—followed by my deeper dive into the first of these specific ideas:

  • Teaching-The-Teachers Salon
  • The Classroom On 3DP Steroids
  • Maker Space Grassroots-Ed
  • Drop-Out Drop-In
  • Workforce Development
  • Economic Development Organization (EDO) Academies
  • Startup/Ramp-Up On-The-Job-Training (OJT)
  • Volunteering To Advance
  • The “3DP Guild-Gang”

Teaching-The-Teachers Salon

First, we need to educate educators. The folks who can multiple “The 3DP Word” across groups of interested students—even if they are already teachers—of the technology. This does NOT need to take place in traditional educational settings. In fact, formal, credentialed and/or institutional educator norms are probably the last avenue of advance—while eventually a necessary one in saturation or end-game scenarios—in our kick-off educational effort. But—in today’s enriched, enabling and omni-present tech environment—we certainly do not need to start with raising barriers to access or empowerment via standard modes of teaching colleges…

3DP is—uniquely—a hyper-local, grassroots, DIY/DIT (Do-It-Together)-capable technology. I’ve held forth here before about the inherent “democratization” engine of 3DP. That is the ability of this revolutionary tech to empower the individual tinkerer or artisan or innovator on the kitchen table, at garage bench or in the incipient eCottage.

With auto-empowerment in mind, let’s talk about “desire lines.” This phrase is a delightful term art in economic development, travel patterns and commuting vectors that we can borrow to illustrate the democratization-power of 3DP.

(From left) Brad Chapman, Technology Specialist at Kauffman Labs, conceptualizes with his hands for Panelist Dr. Haytham Elhawary, Exec Director, Zahn Innovation Center, CCNY, CUNY --- who had just spoken at “Lessons Learned: 3D Printers in the Classroom,” at “Inside 3D Printing NY” trade show at the Javits Center on 3 April 2014.

(From left) Brad Chapman, Technology Specialist at Kauffman Labs, conceptualizes with his hands for Panelist Dr. Haytham Elhawary, Exec Director, Zahn Innovation Center, CCNY, CUNY — who had just spoken at “Lessons Learned: 3D Printers in the Classroom,” at “Inside 3D Printing NY” trade show at the Javits Center on 3 April 2014.

When it’s important to them, people find their own paths to desired goals. Regardless of the prescribed way-faring, “logical” routes or preformed infrastructure that may—or may not—be in place to get them there.

These informal “paths” are desire lines—what folks on the ground wish were in place to enable new ways of “getting there.” When these “lines” do not exist, people cobble them up—until demonstrated demand eventually forces the infrastructure into existence.

The same holds true with education in 3DP technology. People want the knowledge to get into the 3DP game. Some see this demonstrated desire as an opportunity to both empower people—and create a cadre of believer/teachers who will geometrically multiply that effort in enablement.

(Yeah, “cadre.” A framework, nucleus or core group of often DIY/DIT trained, unified and inspired people who are capable of assuming/taking control and educating others to a like-level of action-making/taking. This venerable word gets great use in revolutions—like our current 3DP-driven upheaval. This cadre vector applies to our teaching the teacher…in this iteration perhaps “barefoot pedagogues”…)

So, if we eschew the educational establishment—at least for the moment—where are the 3DP desire lines and self-coalescing cadre driving us?

The ultimate “coalescer” in our grassroots change-making is the Internet. The Internet empowers desire-line creation. The Internet enables the DIY/DIT education that drives our 3DP community-level action.

Think in terms of online education and the small-group learning. Just-Enough-Training (JET) make things happen. And, JET begins to build 3DP-revolution momentum. Especially in training the trainers, the teachers, the cadre…at the hyper-local level of our communities.

3DP & EDU & KIDS: Our Posterized Invitation...

3DP & EDU & KIDS: Our Posterized Invitation…

Thus: capture the small classes by the DIY experts on video and narrowcast them, Webinar them and live stream them on the Internet. Voila: grassroots online ed for the 3DP cadre—and everyone else. The Webinar “teachers’ college.” The Meetups as TeachUps. The Skillshare concept. The General Assembly mode writ large. The curricula cobbled up by cadre in the trenches along those Desire Lines…

We have much more to talk about as we work our way down our list of 3DP-education “bullets” for action.

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

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The “How-To” of 3DP Implementation (cont.): Education As THE Engine Of Digi/Fab Advance; OR, Modes Of Thought Transformed To The Tangible…

For Most Just Now, 3DP Is That “Bright & Shiny Thing” Magnetic To The Magpie In Us Humans; 3DP Is New And Novel In Our Commercial And Community Environments; Almost Everyone With Interest Is Going-Up The Learning Curve Of Understanding The Technology…

Three Experts in 3DP Education enjoy the moment: these Panelists have just spoken at "Lessons Learned: 3D Printers in the Classroom," at "Inside 3D Printing" trade show at the Javits Center on 3 April 2014; (left to right) Tom Meeks, Training Director, YouthQuest Foundation, Inc.; Joseph Scott, Vice President, Scott & Associates; Dr. Haytham Elhawary, Director, Zahn Innovation Center, CCNY, CUNY.

Three Experts in 3DP Education enjoy the moment: these Panelists have just spoken at “Lessons Learned: 3D Printers in the Classroom,” at “Inside 3D Printing” trade show at the Javits Center on 3 April 2014; (left to right) Tom Meeks, Training Director, YouthQuest Foundation, Inc.; Joseph Scott, Vice President, Scott & Associates; Dr. Haytham Elhawary, Director, Zahn Innovation Center, CCNY, CUNY.

…and we’re often equally positioned in our ignorance. Ironically—as I will explain—that’s probably a good thing at this stage of our Society-wide introduction to 3DP. As William Gibson—noir science-fiction author and cyberpunk prophet said in 1993—”The future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed.”

So, fully one-third of those recently polled want a desktop 3D printer in their homes. The other two-thirds may have a hard time spelling “3DP”—let alone conceiving how the technology physically works its Additive-Manufacturing magic.

So, as I stated a few posts ago (on this same topic of the “How-T0″ of 3DP Implementation), 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication education is key to integrating this new—and VERY powerful—technology into both our commerce and our common-good.

Technological newness levels the playing field. The haves and the have-nots play fairly for a time—as the 1 over 99 asymmetry has not yet distorted the rules and paid off the refs and bribed the best players.

No institutions or organizations have managed to entrench 3DP “credential-ism.” There’s no 3DP Ph.D on offer just now. No band of proprietary professionals or trade association have yet formulated a governing regimen. Further, little or no regulation or public policy has been put in place to guide (or constrain) early players.

Thus—beyond those imposed by IP protections—there are no current barriers to entry into our 3DP wonderland. Education is the engine and the train is leaving the station…

Not to strain this metaphor too far…but you could think about the different “cars” in which you might ride this express to your personal 3DP glory. Here’s how you might journey into our mutual future—via venues and/or modes—as headlined by bullet-point:

  • Teaching-The-Teachers Salon
  • The Classroom On 3DP Steroids
  • Maker Space Grassroots-Ed
  • Drop-Out Drop-In
  • Workforce Development
  • Economic Development Organization (EDO) Academies
  • Startup/Ramp-Up On-The-Job-Training (OJT)
  • Volunteering To Advance
  • The “3DP Guild-Gang”

Each of these headlines entitles an education strategy for your—or your local communities—”How-To” of 3DP implementation. I’m going to flesh-out each of these modes in my next post(s) on this particular part of our high-balling Education Express to 3DP fulfillment…

AND—as I said at the start of this post—many of us are equally positioned in our ignorance of 3DP. THIS is a good thing. Unlike the rest of our Asymmetric Society and our 1/99 Disequilibrium, 3DP is new to most of our fellow citizens (and potentially renewable Middle Class). Thus, a very-large percentage of our population will have a (refreshingly!) equal opportunity to leverage 3DP for new jobs, new businesses and new economic development.

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NYC’s Biggest (So Far) 3DP Trade Event— “Inside 3D Printing NY 2014″ —Wow’d The (In- & Would-Be-In) Crowd At The Javits At The End Of Last Week

I3DP NY ’14 Was The Second Iteration Of This Pioneering 3DP Conference & Expo & It Improved On The Premier Effort Of April 2013 With More Keynotes, Speakers, Sessions, Exhibitors, Attendance—AND An Added & Integrated “Maker Summit & Pavilion…”

Avi Reichental, President & CEO of 3D Systems Corp., presenting the first Keynote at "Inside 3D Printing" at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Avi Reichental, President & CEO of 3D Systems Corp., presenting the first Keynote at “Inside 3D Printing” at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Ah, the Trade Show! THE commercial gathering-in for always-gregarious humans. The place where Homo Sapiens (“wise man”) transforms to Homo Negotium (“business man”). Latin “negotium” is also the root of English “negotiate.” And, you can only do that with another human.

The trade show is also the richest marketing environment on the planet. And, our New York City “puts on a [business] show” of note some 800 times a year. (Pace Mickey Rooney—”Hey, kids! Let’s put on a show…”—who died yesterday at 93.) In our City, you’re just a subway ride away from some kind of trade-show ecstasy—and business-success knowledge—on almost any day of the year.

Now, 3D Printing is “putting on a show”…to match its new and burgeoning presence in the consciousness of business people—and humans of every other stripe.

Well, you could hardly expect anything less from this (30-year-old) “overnight sensation.” Our 3D Printing is now touted by media, manufacturers and Masters of the (Old & New) Universe as transformative of…wait for it…almost everything.

Hod Lipson, Associate Professor, Cornell University, co-author of FABRICATED and the overall Master of Ceremonies at "Inside 3D Printing" at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Hod Lipson, Associate Professor, Cornell University, co-author of FABRICATED and the overall Master of Ceremonies at “Inside 3D Printing” at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

New York online-media impresario and trade-show producer Mediabistro recognized what a commercial bonanza could be garnered from the seemingly inexhaustible interest in 3DP. (My neologism for Additive Manufacturing, 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication.)

After staging I3DP NY ’13, Mediabistro has bolted around the world founding “Inside 3D Printing…”-branded events in at least 10 additional venues. From Santa Clara to Seoul, Melbourne to Milan, Shanghai to Sao Paulo—and nearly every compass-point city in-between. On the business-strategy theory that first with the most usually furthers…?

We’re still at the stage of public notoriety in which eyes invariably light-up and smiles of expectation greet the statement that you might be an insider at the wondrous 3DP Funhouse. (Because—like that carney institution—many people have now seen or heard of our 3DP-tech phenom, but few have actually gained access to the lightning-stroke excitement and the slightly sulfurous scent {melted ABS?} of magic behind the garishly painted facade.)

With business vision, budget and bodacious-ness, Mediabistro grabbed 3DP headliners and honchos to participate at I3DP NY ’14 at the Javits Center on 2, 3 and 4 April. That’s 56 speakers, 43 sessions, 37 exhibitors (three-times last year’s), attendees from 45 countries and 43 U.S. States—totaling a 4,000-plus gate.

I myself managed to take in 13 of the sessions, enjoyed most of the exhibits and exchanged business cards—and ideas—individually with forty + players and fellow attendees in two full days. (On the show floor, I concentrated on 3D Systems, the largest exhibitor-presence by far—and the banner/Platinum sponsor—as the company was last year. Hey, they had the most gee-whiz goodies to “show & tell.”)

Christine Furstoss, Technical Director of Manufacturing & Materials Technologies, GE Global Research, presenting her Keynote at "Inside 3D Printing" at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Christine Furstoss, Technical Director of Manufacturing & Materials Technologies, GE Global Research, presenting her Keynote at “Inside 3D Printing” at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Granted this show’s stats can’t (yet!) compete with the mega-trade events that fill the entire Javits (e.g., National Retailer Federation’s “Big Show” or the NYC “Boat Show”). I3DP NY ’14 had a downstairs venue and a relatively small footprint. But, this industry is (3DP) fabricating Seven-League Boots… (The estimate for our 3DP sector is a market value of $2.5 billion in 2013 AND $16.2 billion in 2018: that’s 45.7 percent growth in just five years.)

I think the best way to sample I3DP NY ’14—and gain some high-level insights with grassroots’ impact—is via the show’s keynotes. Keeping up with the trend to “keynote” excessively, there were five in all over two days. Three—appropriately—were by industry heavy-weights known to most in the “insider” audience. These marquee players were:

  1. Avi Reichental, President and CEO of 3D Systems;
  2. Christine Furstoss, Technical Director of Manufacturing & Materials Technologies of GE Global Research; and
  3. Carl Bass, President and CEO of Autodesk.

In this post, I’d like to spotlight the keynote of 3D Systems’ Avi Reichental. It has—I believe—the hands-on passion of a guy battling it out in the trenches of the 3DP business day-to-day. While, at the same time, garnering a view of the marketplace battlefield—and the larger commercial war—over the parapet of the action.

Avi’s 3D Systems—for the second year—more or less “owned” the show as THE Platinum Sponsor and dominant exhibitor. (Stratasys was a “sponsor” of the event but was otherwise nearly invisible and its sub Brooklyn-based MakerBot had no presence at all—last year both at least had booths.) So—mirabile dictu—Avi presented the first keynote.

Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot and the “poster boy” of desktop 3DP, may currently be the smartest marketer in our new industrial sector. BUT, I think Avi Reichental is the smartest business man in 3DP.  And, thus gets his full-length, oil-painting portrait—in the ornate gilt-on-gesso frame—high on the wall of the 3DP Hall of Fame.

Carl Bass, President & CEO of Autodesk, presenting his Keynote at "Inside 3D Printing" at the Javits Center, NYC, on 4 April 2014.

Carl Bass, President & CEO of Autodesk, presenting his Keynote at “Inside 3D Printing” at the Javits Center, NYC, on 4 April 2014.

In his keynote, Avi started by waxing philosophical—appropriate for a man who has been in this new/old business for a long time.

He talked about the “meaning” of 3DP and the “passion for making.” He sees a kind of “pre-industrial cast” to 3D printing which is creating a “localized digital-craftsmanship renaissance.” 3DP is empowering people to exercise their “craftsmanship muscles” again. He emphatically states that 3DP is “meaningful, transformative and impactful.”

Mr. Reichental used the metaphor of a “connected digital thread,” that stretches from—and weaves together—”designing to making” and “the factory of the future, the engine of the future and the home of the future.”

In parallel with his take on meaning and making, Avi believes that 3DP is now about the “democratization” of manufacturing—with its inherent “advancing and democratizing” effects on commerce.

As a result, Avi Reichental sees 3DP as “a $30 billion opportunity over the next few years.” [Pretty bold forecast as 3DP industry value---depending on who you believe---is now around $2.5 to $3 billion! "Yowza"---as we say in Brooklyn...]

As opposed to the 3DP’s early years of rapid prototyping and reverse engineering usage, Avi foresees the technology morphing into a “mass manufacturing” engine, with “smart and multi-materials,” hitting the “sweet spot” of “making millions of identical parts with a flexibility that could NOT be done in any other way.”

3D Systems’ President and CEO Reichental projects that 3DP will thus “turn ‘economies of scale’ on its head.” The tech will deliver products at the “same price for one or millions” yet with “unlimited complexity.” AND, these same disrupting “capability is available to GE AND startups.”

Avi Reichental, President & CEO of 3D Systems, demo'ing rock-star 3DP-produced sunglasses, at his Keynote at "Inside 3D Printing" at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Avi Reichental, President & CEO of 3D Systems, demo’ing rock-star 3DP-produced sunglasses, at his Keynote at “Inside 3D Printing” at the Javits Center, NYC, on 3 April 2014.

Avi played on his 3D Systems’ branding campaign of “all powered by 3DPRINTING 2.0″ by stating that his company’s production printers are now capable of “fab-grade [to semi-conductor standards] manufacturing.” Leading this charge is DDD’s capability in “direct-metal printing.” As he is wont to do via M&A (45+ acquisitions in the last two and a half years), Avi & Co. bought direct-metal leader, France-based Phenix Systems in July 2013.

Mr. Reichental also continued touching on 3DP-tech democratization effects—and what he called “re-localization” of production. He foresaw small-scale production bolstered by “continuous manufacturing systems [with output] in the tens of thousands.” He stated that pro-makers will be able to up-scale their businesses via the “success of high-speed, flexible manufacturing systems.” Makers will be able to think: “If I can design it, I can make it.”

Avi posited that the key was “how to distribute this re-localization.” What will be needed—according to Seer Reichental— is the “hybridization of [3DP] workflows with traditional workflows.”

To underline the granularity of relocalization—and what I’ve been calling the “eCottage Industry Revolution”—Avi asked “in what room in your house will your 3D printer reside?!” In other words, how many different uses will you have for the machine that can print almost anything?

Mr. Reichental has a reply for skeptics who will doubt his predictions. “Don’t be gripped by denial.” 3DP is “undeniably exponential.” Everyone “thinks you’re crazy until change catches up!”

And, Avi Reichental obviously thinks change is racing to confirm his projected 3DP future…

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

 

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In A World Of Constant Change, Technological Flux & The Accelerating Ever-New, Education IS The Certain Cure For Our Public & Private Vertigo From Revolutionary Transformation

In My Last Post, I Began A Discussion Of The “How-To” Of 3DP Implementation—Or The Processes Of Making The Power Of This New Technology Work For People At The Unit Of The Local Community—By Using i3E (Inspiration, Education, Entrepreneurship & Economic Development): “Inspired” Last Time, We’re Now On To Education…

A Pair of Robohands, A Seminal Example of DIY/DIT 3DP-Driven "Good-Enough Tech" (GET). Thanks to MakerBot for the photo (these Robohands were made on a MakerBot printer).

A Pair of Robohands, A Seminal Example of DIY/DIT 3DP-Driven “Good-Enough Tech” (GET). Thanks to MakerBot for the photo (these Robohands were made on a MakerBot printer).

In this blog, we’ve regularly examined the world of more formal (sometimes called “classroom”) education around 3DP—the environment of STEM and STE(A)M. (I.e., Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design and Math.) Here we find classic pedagogy that spans the spectrum from as “Teaching The Teachers” to job training—all important initiatives and necessary parts of the total 3DP education mix.

Borrowing from “Field of Dreams” with this last—job training—we could posit: “Teach It & They Will Hire!” At the same time, we could also strongly suggest—given the startup opportunities empowered by 3DP—”Found It & YOU Will Hire!”

And, recently, we’ve looked at more informal learning structures in the DIY and DIT (Do-It-Together) spaces. Last post—for instance—we touched on the Maker Ethos and the Makers’ “platform” of spaces, places, clubs and other congregating and affiliating venues.

In such locales, we can find hyper-practical, 3DP-enabled working concepts like JEL: “Just Enough Learning” to make something. (And then—of course—iterate it to success…because, with 3DP, you can!) And, JEL delivers GET: “Good-Enough Tech.” (For an example of GET, see the video of DIY/DIT-produced “Robohand.”)

So much universally useful is happening in the classroom that I think we should continue this discussion of 3DP Education—as a 3DP driver of how-to success—by revisiting one of my earlier posts on this topic.

Last September, we ran a series of Roundtables—on important segments and sectors of 3DP—that we called “NY3DP Summits.” One of these Roundtables was entitled “3DP & Kids.” This is a Vlog with our embedded video record of the seminal eight-expert-plus-moderator discussion.

For your education, I’m presenting the Vlog here (below) in its entirety. (Note the the links to the two-part video are near the bottom of the post.)

The ideas shared here—such as 3DP as the ultimate platform for Project-Base Learning (PBL: literally, hands-on teaching)—are simply terrific. So good that I may extract the best comments and concepts from the video stream, transcribe them and post them here in my next piece on the “how-to” of 3DP education. (But, you can see them for yourself right now—as presented an exceptional group of talented, innovative and expert Roundtable members—in our video “3DP & Kids.”)

C’mon Back!

LAND

+++

 

“3DP & Kids”: 3D-Printing Tech Will Advance STE(A)M Education, Enable Teachers & Foster 21st C. Skills

The NY3DP Summits Roundtable In Which Digital-Discipline Teachers, Art/Tech Academics & Educational-Technology Players Examine Why, How & What “Students” Should Be 3D Printing & DigiFabbing—Whether Those Learners Are Children Or Adults.

We entitled our third expert Roundtable—convoked on Wednesday, 25 September of our Summits‘ Week at the Elisabeth Irwin High School in Greenwich Village—”3DP & Kids.”  Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin High School (LREI) were among the leaders of the progressive school movement in the City. As host of our Roundtable on this cutting-edge topic in Education Technology, LREI proves it is still expanding the boundaries of K-12 teaching.

The necessary short-hand of titles also foreshortens nuance. Additionally, our Roundtable discussed the 3DP and Digital Fabrication vectors that are driving perhaps the most important engine of this disruptive change-agent. That is 3DP’s ability to impart higher knowledge and creativity via hand-brain learning—or education by doing. (See LREI-host Mark Silberberg’s introductory comments—about what I might characterize as “eShop”—early in this Vlog’s video Part 1.)

Other new and applicable terms of art in action here are “visual thinking,” “spatial reasoning” and Project-Based Learning. Education—about and in deployment of change—underpins 3DP and DigiFab empowerment of everything else this new technology touches.

In putting this Roundtable together, 3DP Media enjoyed the professional help of two NYC educators who are steeped in the Ed-Tech sector—and leading the way in the educational practices around 3DP/DigiFab.

These two are first Saber Khan, our event MC and Roundtable Moderator. He is also Technology Teacher and Curriculum Integrator at Little Red School House (LREI). My middle-school teacher (Oakland, CA) son-in-law Rowan Driscoll introduced me to Saber—they were formally colleagues in a summer-program around innovative teaching disciplines at UC Berkeley—in July. Saber enthusiastically supported—and added to—our “3DP & Kids” Roundtable concepts, helped recruit session participants and convinced LREI administrators to deploy resources and host our event at their Elisabeth Irwin High School.

Secondly, Lizabeth Arum, who was former Education Coordinator for the Makerbot Foundation and is “Design Thinking” and Physical Computing teacher (via 3DP) at Saint Ann’s School in Brooklyn. She reached out to her very-extensive list of friends and colleagues in the segment. As a result, we enjoyed Liz—and a very powerful set of thought leaders and topic experts on our Roundtable. Our synergy-driving participants exchanged provocatively and innovatively on the widest implications and impresario-thinking around “3DP & Kids.”

Our expert Roundtablers discussed moderated-questions, sparked and investigated other promising educational vectors, shared field-tested concepts and solution-developed with audience input.

Come enjoy the compelling action via these links to our “3DP & Kids” videos: PART 1 and PART 2.

Dynamite stuff for the K-12 classroom. AND, for any educational environment where knowledge, training, how-to—and inspiration!—needs imparting. Think startup entrepreneurs, ramping-up small-business owners, workforce-redevelopment participants and local economic development organizations and their already-aggregated communities of small-business constituents.

C’mon Back!

LAND

[End]

 

 

 

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Had Enough 3DP “Gee-Whiz?” How About Some 3DP “Get Wizardry?”—Time To Go From Hype To How-To On The 3DP Power Curve!

You Know A Revolution Is Real When The Folks In The Street Start Using Their Torches To Illuminate The Way And Their Pitchforks To Clear The Path To Their Personal Futures—And Everyone’s Public Fulfillment…

Fireworks & Bombards at the Brooklyn Bridge

Fireworks & Bombards at the Brooklyn Bridge

If you’re like us, it’s hard not to be blinded by the constant fireworks and bombards of new 3DP innovations, products, systems and services rocketing across the world’s consciousness—and down the not-so-distant arc of our collective future. With all the accompanying Oohs  and Ahhs. AND, strategic bedazzlement…

Still—at this point—all the aggregate creativity and commercial pyrotechnics HAVE begun to shed light on where the 3DP revolution is headed. Now is the time for the starry-eyed to refocus on how-to actually begin using 3DP profitably across the broader spectrum of 3DP-susceptible commercial activity…

That is the “how-to” of 3DP implementation in the vertical segments and sectors of business.  For (as I like to say) the betterment of community commerce and common-good—the social “verticals”: the ones that matter most.

If there’s a new ethos driving all this—and I believe there IS—then it’s an artistic approach to science and a design-driving of technology. An anarchic analog filter bending our straight-line digital world-view toward creativity. Less perfection and precision; more practicality cum personality. Funky functionality.

Our tech-engined world is changing so rapidly that even incomplete knowledge is ever less possible. AND, may not matter—because the next tech breakthrough will vitiate past business decision-making “givens.” We’re all making more commercial judgments on fewer facts—because technological “truths” can be switch-flipped to commercial “falsehoods” by accelerating tech-engined change in the marketplace.

Steve Jobs: Creative by Design...

Steve Jobs: Creative by Design…

At the same time, many competitive-edge-seeking business people are now acutely aware that Steve Jobs proved “Design is the new black.” Apple’s incredible rocketing to world dominance as the planet’s most valuable company—in the years just before Jobs’ death—was empowered by Product Look-&-Feel, UI (User-Interface), UX (User Experience) and UT (User Transformation).

This last, this ”UT”—State of Heart more than Mind—enabled the legendary Jobsian “Reality-Distortion Field.” It also empowered Apple’s irrational hold on the collective psyche of its hyper-loyal community of Believers. (Other companies just hope for occasionally meh-pacificed users.) Steve proved that successful product, industrial and interface design is more about emotion than engineering—and that kind of success can lead to segment dominance.

From the 3DP perspective, we’re right back to one of my favorite neologisms: “Techreative.” I’ve been using this term to describe the hybrid human (or, often, hybrid hipster?) who groks both tech and creativity—and can “synergize” the two as s/he uses 3DP technology. In our new 3DP/DigiFab world, Techreatives will rule. (And, did I say that NeoBrooklyn may have more of these incipient 3DP ArTechs than any other Ultra-Urban community in the world?)

Nuance (design creativity) trumps knowing (digital certainty). Just Enough Learning (JEL) + Collaboration Across the Net (CAN) delivers Good-Enough Tech (GET). (Think the spiritual/social grip of virally appreciated “Robohand“: the world-flung, DIT-inspired, iteration-organized, home-built, sprue-loose/less neo-prosthetic for metacarpal-challenged children that demo JEL CAN GET. Whoa!)

ZERO TO MAKER---LEARN (JUST ENOUGH) TO MAKE (JUST ABOUT) ANYTHING By David Lang

ZERO TO MAKER—LEARN (JUST ENOUGH) TO MAKE (JUST ABOUT) ANYTHING
By David Lang

So, our 3DP stage is set for new uses of “how-to.” It’s time. DemosTech—our Democritizing Technology of 3DP—fosters phenomena like “JEL CAN GET.”

Because creativity doesn’t flow from credentialism. With 3DP, the formally untutored possess equal sway with Ph.Ds. The new Maker in her Space/ Place/ Lab/ Kitchen declaims—by hand—as expressively and effectively as the Professor at the podium. (For more, see Zero To Make, David Lang’s personal story-energized exegesis on the making of Makers; his subtitle says it all: “Learn (Just Enough) to Make (Just About) Anything.“)

How do we define “how-to”—and deliver it—when more and more 3DP-interested folks can begin real efforts of worth via JEL: Just Enough Learning?

(Wonder if I’m over-stating my case for further empowering DIY/DIT {Do-It-Together} grassroots 3DP fecundity? Here are FIVE new recent “fuels” for this engine of proactive change: {1} better CAD {Computer-Aided-Design} software, {2} wider selection of printing materials, {3} scanning as designing, {4} larger printer build-volumes and {5} shorter printing times.)

Let’s start with the how-to of i3E. Inspiration, Education, Entrepreneurship & Economic Development.

I could make a case for everything else in this semi-acronym—or, perhaps, all of life?!—stems from Inspiration. Without the desire and drive to act, “3DP” or “i3E” are just three characters on the page. And, humanity never gets out of bed.

Inspiration is that magic “ah ha”—a sparking/sparkling palindrome—that comes from an enigmatic amalgam of curiosity, questioning and what-if.

How do we “how-to” Inspiration? How long can we prolong childhood into old age? Or, at least the sensibility of the wondering child as flint and tinderbox to conflagrating creativity. (Perhaps the most important work of BioSci should be that prolongation of dewy imagination and burbling ingenuity.) Creativity is the coruscating gold of humanity.

Inspiration Lightbulb: 3DP'd Metal?? Thx to John L. Scott Partner Connection!

Inspiration Lightbulb: 3DP’d Metal??
Thx to John L. Scott Partner Connection!

The best I think we can probably do here—with the how-to of Inspiration—is to rebuild the “playgrounds” of childhood. In the hopes that pure play will rekindle the sparks of Inspiration—and the joy of finding-out and building up—unfettered by any need but unalloyed exploration. The giggling itch of curiosity scratched. In my mind—in the world of civilian and community-based 3DP—these playgrounds are now the Makerspaces that have coalesced out of new-tech empowerment and DIY/DIT inclinations.

The Maker Sensibility may just be another term for Inspiration aggregated and empowered.

Next time—right here—we’ll continue the exploration of our “how-tos” with the 3Es of i3E.

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How-to and all, 3DP will grow into an entire ecosystem—with ancillary platforms and vectors likely to create an entire new constellation to blow our benighted minds. With constituent stars and configurations yet to align themselves in the balancing out—to sustainability—of capitalistic gravitational attraction and repulsion inherent in marketplace commerce.

And, you’re here at the Creation.

So much more to discuss…

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

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The New World (Disrupted) Order of 3DP: The Engines Of 3D-Printing Are Iterating As Fast As Rapid-Prototyping On Steroids—Now We Need “How-To”

If We’re At The Apple II Stage of 3DP Development in This Accelerating Revolution, The “Killer App” (Our 3DP VisiCalc) Is Now How-To Implement Successful Commercial And Common-Good Change With All The 3DP Power At Hand…

FABRICATED---THE NEW WORLD OF 3D PRINTING By Hod Lipson & Melba Kurman

FABRICATED—THE NEW WORLD OF 3D PRINTING
By Hod Lipson & Melba Kurman.         This marvelous overview is the best “3DP 101″ currently available. Even as the tech evolves at lightning speed, the issues and ideas presented here will continue to matter…

As many of you know—who show up here on occasion—as the Founder/Publisher of 3DP Media, I focus exclusively on covering 3DP. With—I own up—a kind of messianic zeal. But, this stuff—this 3DP—IS important. And, we need to figure it out… Before 3DP gains a dark-side reputation—every disruptive tech whispers blow-back—for creating more problems than it solves.

“3DP” is a mashup, a semi-acronym. 3DP—the new “word,” the neologism—combines all the most recent industry segment usages, presents a visual cue and rhymes when said. Most of the signifiers in this business are multi-syllabic and arduous phrases. 3-Dimensional Printing, Additive Manufacturing, Computer Numerical Control, Digital Fabrication. That’s why I’m sure “3DP” will be the natural linguistic evolution—the common street parlance—from the phrase “3D Printing.” This last is now the current “brand” for our industrial sector. BUT, usage will rebrand it 3DP.

3DP is also the 4th Disruptor! In order of timeline debut, these four landmarks of our Digital Age are: (1) PC; (2) Internet; (3) Social Media; (4) 3DP. Disruptors (1) thru (3) are Digital; 3DP is Neo-Analog! I’ve lectured before about our Disruptor Regimen; but it bears repeating. Because, our Fourth Disruptor promises to help re-industrialize and rejuvenate American manufacturing—by (among other make-over vectors) “new-shoring” it IN the United States. AND, that’s before we discuss the entirely novel uses of 3DP in wide-spectrum commerce. It is now possible—with a straight face—to say 3DP will change everything.

In this time of high flux—in this moment of the Fourth Disruptor “launch”—the rules of many business segments are about to change. And, everyone’s  business opportunities are writ as in quicksilver. Whether it’s for personal, fiscal or common-good gain. As are a number of other rules by which we live(d): think social, civic and commercial. OR, think all three at once: what some call Economic Development.

So, how should any of us play—for profit and/or society’s benefit—the New World (Disrupted) Order of 3DP?

First, it helps to remember that Fourth Disruptor 3DP is a complete-make-over technology that is fundamentally different from the first three Disruptors of the last 40 years. Disruptions Numbers One through Three were mostly about digits or bits. (Thought: what you can hold in your head or digital device or Cloud-based system.) Fourth Disruptor 3DP is mostly about atoms. (Things: what you can hold in your hand.)

And, those “thought” proceeds of the first Three Disruptions can be transformed into “thing” proceeds of the Fourth: bits become atoms in a magical roundelay of iterations to quick-time product success. You could call it Magical Manufacturing: Thinking  Things…

(And, many people—just now—have a hard time envisioning how Additive Manufacturing, aka “3D Printing,” works. It does seem magical. Or, as science-fiction savant and seer Arthur C. Clark once opined: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”)

Magic or advanced technology, 3DP certainly is—and will continue at an accelerating pace—creating change. And—contrary to the idea of the destruction of commercial disruption—we should consider 3DP change to be the most creativity-making opportunity in our time. Still—as with any empowering engine—this atom-manipulating genii from a digital bottle needs proactive management and intelligent guidance.

ZERO TO MAKER---LEARN (JUST ENOUGH) TO MAKE (JUST ABOUT) ANYTHING By David Lang

ZERO TO MAKER—LEARN (JUST ENOUGH) TO MAKE (JUST ABOUT) ANYTHING
By David Lang.                                      Want an insider look at the Maker Movement? This is the best overview—via personal, hands-on storytelling by a reporter/acolyte who made the Maker journey and celebrates why.

I’m certainly not suggesting that we seek governmental, legal or regulatory protection from 3DP’s creative destruction. No, what we really need is 3DP propagated DIY/DIT (Do-It-Together) at the grassroots. Think: the Maker Ethos on steroids.

And, the level from which 3DP-driven change should arise—most effectively—is from the BOTTOM. As in DIY and DIT, grassroots, local-community bottom-up. If ever there were a technology that could be described as “democratizing,” 3DP is it.  Call it DemosTech. (“Common People Technology”; and—when you’re out soap-boxing—pronounce the “demos” with a long “e.”)

Now, everyone (empowered by Moore’s Law and lapsing IP protections on early 3DP patents) can “do” this Industry on their kitchen table in their eCottage. Voila! eCottage Industry in the 21st Century.

In the last four or five years, another powerful Bottom-Up Driver of this 3DP DemosTech has developed—mostly under the commercial, political and media-coverage radar.

(OBTW, this “last four or five years” is about the lifespan of Brooklyn’s MakerBot: during which time that startup—more or less—spearheaded the creation of the desktop or home 3D Printer market. Yep: bottom up… In fact—ironically—MakerBot used to manufacture in Brooklyn’s Gowanus neighborhood in what they called “BotCaves.” Those structures could have been mistaken for remnants of 19th C. “dark satanic mills” hard by a SuperFund site. Really “bottom…”)

One of the unheralded Bottom-Up DemosTech Drivers is the early (3DP) adopting Maker Movement. The Movement includes makers, crafters, artisans, tinkers, tech/artists, STEM/STE(A)M teachers, eHobbyists, benign hackers, micro-controller geeks, DIY/DITers and more. These are the quintessential “atoms” people—who have used “digits” (the Internet) to find each other, aggregate and form communities in physical Maker Spaces, Places, Fabs, Labs, Studios, Collectives and Workshops. (MakerBot sprang from one of these early—and on-going—”places”: NYC Resistor.)

So, Makers have been among the first to figure out how to monetize 3DP. (At least at the local-community level; a few professional and industrial segments—automotive, aerospace—have been working 3Dp since it was invented 30 years ago.) Maker interest, curiosity and necessity (i.e., lack of capitalistic resources) begat hands-on learning begat hobbies begat playful RD&D begat innovations begat products begat startups—via DIY/DIT and iterations…lots of iterations. Something 3DP does very well.

Now, if 3DP is to accomplish all that I’m talking about here—and we haven’t even touched on the common-good aspects like job generation—we need to get deeper into the “how-to” of this disruption-making/opportunity-presenting phenomenon. How are the new MakerBots-to-be leveraging 3DP? And, how can we propagate these success-techniques across every appropriate industry and business in America?!

With this post, I’m beginning an examination of these aspects of the “how-to” so necessary to the advance—and empowerment—of 3DP.

C’mon Back!

LAND 

 

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How To Triumph In 3DP-Driven Economic Development: When You Witness The Start Of A (Tech) Revolution, Join With The Partisans Of Common-Good. Those Glad-Heart Guerrillas Are Gonna Win…

When Technology (Once Again!) Disrupts Our Commercial Lives, It’s Important To Assure That We Also Put The New (3DP!) “Tech Engine” To Work To Drive Local-Community Economic Development—For The Benefit Of The Commonweal And A Wide Spectrum Of Constituencies…

Sean Eldridge, President of Hudson River Ventures & a Founder/Benefactor of the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center at SUNY New Paltz, exchanges with Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot, and key-noter at the the Grand Opening Celebration at the "MakerBot Innovation Center" at SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014.

Sean Eldridge, President of Hudson River Ventures & a Founder/Benefactor of the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center/HV3D at SUNY New Paltz, exchanges with Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot, and key-noter at the the Grand Opening Celebration at the “MakerBot Innovation Center” at SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014.

How can we assure that 3DP—with all its promised disruption AND creativity—adds to the betterment of our commerce AND common-good? “To Triumph In 3DP-Driven Economic Development”—as this post’s title posits.

Well, I’ve got a perfect paradigm for you to parse. An Epic Win (in game-play parlance)—called the MakerBot Innovation Center. This Win is one that real folks can emulate and make their own—from the bottom up—at their local-community level.

An Epic Win In An Unlikely Place

In February, a small group of hyper-local individuals and organizations in an Upstate New York region celebrated the debut of a first-time-anywhere Economic Development initiative. The tech-engine was revolutionary 3DP and its new epicenter-home in one of their “capital” towns. The local group drove this innovative program successfully via their work as a public/private/pedagogic partnership

On Tuesday, 11 February, MakerBot’s CEO Bre Pettis (acknowledged “poster boy” for DIY/DIT desktop 3D Printing) helped the group of local leaders—in the end, a highly organized and effective Team: really and emphatically—cut the ribbon on the world’s first MakerBot Innovation Center. This was at the SUNY New Paltz campus—in the Hudson Valley two hours north of MakerBot’s hometown Brooklyn.

And, this debut—of something entirely new—was a commercial AND common-good coup…

Local ”Democratizing Technology” Team Implements A Vision

It was a “coup” for the local Team, their (very) involved organizations and the entire Hudson Valley geographic region. The powerful tech engine under this Epic Win was 3DP, yes. Sure, MakerBot’s own commercial cum common-good “Marketing-By-Education” initiatives were also a key lever. And, OK, 3DP is “Democratizing Technology”—DIY & DIT (Do-It-Together) incarnate—and can empower change by enabling imagination in the round (a definition of 3DP?!).

Opening Celebration of the MakerBot Innovation Center at SUNY New Paltz Campus, 11 February 2014: Speakers at the Public Ribbon Cutting (from left to right: Dan Freedman, Dean, School of Science & Engineering; Paul Kassel, Dean, School of Fine & Performing Arts; Bre Pettis, CEO, MakerBot; Sean Eldridge, President, Hudson River Ventures;  Laurence Gottlieb, President & CEO, Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation; Katherine Wilson, Graduate Assistance in the MakerBot Innovation Center.)

Opening Celebration of the MakerBot Innovation Center at SUNY New Paltz Campus, 11 February 2014: Speakers at the Public Ribbon Cutting (off-screen left: Donald Christian, President of SUNY New Paltz & MC; from left to right: Dan Freedman, Dean, School of Science & Engineering; Paul Kassel, Dean, School of Fine & Performing Arts; Bre Pettis, CEO, MakerBot; Sean Eldridge, President, Hudson River Ventures; Laurence Gottlieb, President & CEO, Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation; Katherine Wilson, Graduate Assistance in the MakerBot Innovation Center.)

BUT, BUT, BUT the “DemoTechies” Team DID it. They proved to be implementing visionaries. The people who led this 3DP-centric effort, the new-made enthusiasts who engaged and the entire integrated, instigating group. This Team became THE 3DP manifestation of tech-driven, broad-based, local Economic Development at its best.

I was there in person to cover the Innovation Center’s debut event on 11 February. You can read the techie-journo proceeds of my eye-witnessing and first-hand commentary in THREE blog posts (click through the links here in this overview piece). Three back-to-back articles show how important I think this event—and the constellation of special circumstances around it—was.

Important ESPECIALLY to the advancement of local Economic Development!

Should you care to dive deeper—I recommend these as backgrounders to frame the ideas in the rest of this post—please click on these links to my three recent posts on the seminal New Paltz event and MakerBot as “Edifying Enterprise:”

 

(10 Feb 14) “The Edifying Enterprise: How MakerBot Promotes Its Offerings &…

(12 Feb 14) “MakerBot’s Bre Pettis Helps Cut The Ribbon…

(17 Feb 14) “3DP=STARTUPS=JOBS—21st C. eCottage Industries Are Launching…

 

Employing Disruptive Technology To Drive Economic Development Teams

In local Economic Development, I believe strongly in the importance of coalescing natural allies—at the local-community level—around technology systems and engines that can empower Economic Development.  That’s exactly what the local New Paltz Innovation Center Team did.

The impetus to build these kinds of Teams can come from hyperlocal leadership. Or, a node on a nascent neighborhood, near-at-hand community or regional network. Or, it might be coalesced and/or launched with the help of an outside organization with common-good intent—and a concrete vision and/or proven system on which to model support structures and on-going operations.

In the case of our New Paltz Team, it was a little of each of these…and much more. A new paradigm…

One rack of MakerBot 3DP equipment --- 35 plus Replicator 2 3D Printers --- with a Graduate Assistant at the MakerBot Innovation Center Opening Ceremony, 11 February 2014, SUNY New Paltz.

One of several racks of MakerBot 3DP equipment — among 35 plus Replicator 2 3D Printers & Digitizers — with a Graduate Assistant at the MakerBot Innovation Center Opening Ceremony, 11 February 2014, SUNY New Paltz.

We CAN help engender high-levels of commercial AND common-good achievement in local (3DP-driven) tech-enabled Economic Development. The Innovation Center Team created its Epic Win springing from the not-uncommon—but inherently difficult—social, political and economic circumstances in New Paltz and Hudson River Valley. I know it can be done: I’ve been writing about small business ”Tech Empowerment” for years (with that phrase as my positioning statement).

A “Collaborative Home-Team” Building System

Still—even with “Fourth Disruptor” 3DP as the tech impetus or powerful lever—the “Empowering Team” is THE thing.

Now, I think it’s important to coalesce some of these local-ecosystem empowerment ideas into an actually Team building system. To help create what I’m calling 3DP Collaborative Home-Teams. I last commented on this system concept in my 17 February post. BUT—to start—I think a clip from that post would bear repeating here:

The “Collaborative Home-Team” [A Selection From My 17 February Post]:

One solution to this dilemma—of scaling and extending the concept and reality of Innovation Centers out into each local-business community nationwide—is to partner and collaborate with the most-important hyper-local players as a TEAM of community interests.

What I’ve already started to call the Collaborative Home-Team in posts such as these.

In innovative re-industrialization initiatives like this MakerBot Center play, there are natural allies to be recruited and conjoined into an effective local Team. The first-ever MakerBot Innovation Center has proved the concept. That is: such make-it-happen, geography-connected Teams CAN be coalesced into effective engines of common-interest, proactive support and successful change.

Here is my current list of possible-player categories—from which to recruit—to form such community commercial cum common-good groups:

  1. Economic Development Organizations (e.g., Chambers, econ-dev corps, public/private partnerships, biz-improvement districts, etc.);
  2. Education institutions (K through graduate school);
  3. Child-focused organizations outside school-systems (after-school, clubs, Ys, etc.);
  4. Local library systems, museums, historical societies, etc.;
  5. Community Digi/Fab-engined “makers,” tinkerers and artisans of all kinds;
  6. Governments and public agencies & authorities at every level;
  7. The local manufacturing and small-business base;
  8. Institutions with local or regional constituencies (e.g., banks, utilities, clubs); 
  9. Professional services firms (consulting, legal, accounting & venture-capital firms);
  10. Business incubators, accelerators & co-working spaces; and 
  11. Core-industry major players (regardless of physical location).

These organizations have common and commonweal interests that they can naturally help to aggregate and advance change-agents, entrepreneurs, communities, populations, industries and more. The catalyst can be win/win initiatives like MakerBot Innovation Centers. BUT, the on-driving engine must be—at the least—an engaged and energetic leadership (or a cadre of genuine believers) with vision, resources and drive to help bring such Teams together for both commerce and common-good.

Signage at the MakerBot Innovation Center Opening Ceremony, 11 February 2014, SUNY New Paltz, showing some of the Team of local collaborators who helped realize this break-through project.

Signage at the MakerBot Innovation Center Opening Ceremony, 11 February 2014, SUNY New Paltz, showing some of the Team of local collaborators who helped realize this break-through project.

Visualizing A Successful Home-Team

With this Collaborative Home-Team perspective in mind, here’s how the New Paltz Team was structured  (from our Home-Team player categories).

As a diagram of visualization and interaction, think of a hexagon with the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center/HV3D and the MakerBot Innovation Center co-located at the center of the hexagon.

Each of the six main players of the New Paltz Collaborative Home-Team are “located” at one of the six vertices of our hexagon. In no order of precedence, they are:

  1. SUNY New Paltz {Educational Institution};
  2. Hudson River Ventures {Professional services firm};
  3. Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation (HVEDC) {Economic Development Organization};
  4. Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation {Institution with local or regional constituencies};
  5. Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC) {Government and public agencies & authorities}; &
  6. MakerBot Industries {Core-industry major player}.

The primary effect of this “polygon of success” configuration is that all the players are identified, interconnected and focused on the central objective of the program.

A Year Of Leadership & Hard Work In The Hudson Valley

During 2012 and 2013, the four local Hudson Valley players in this group (all but NY State’s MHREDC and MakerBot) laid the basis for common-interest centering and Team coalescing.

The key energizing idea seems to have been using emerging 3DP to drive local Economic Development.

Mid-2012 was still early in the now (more!) clearly booming 3DP revolution. Still, a group of players (and a group outside a tech hub, to boot) committing to an initiative driven by 3DP. This collective stance required intuition or prescience or an appreciation of what 3DP might accomplish that was truly leading edge, a remarkable outlier positioning.

I believe their Epic Win took a combination of all three of these seer ingredients melded…plus luck…timing…AND the magic substance: Leadership.

I don’t (yet) know all the nuances of this important campaign behind the realization of the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center/HV3D and the MakerBot Innovation Center. BUT, I hope to…because this campaign’s ingenuity and resourcefulness needs replication.

The fact is that one (very-effective!) group of mostly local players managed to pull off this 3DP Collaborative Home-Team aggregation and special-campaign advancement. And drove to a (first-ever anywhere) Epic-Win accomplishment with their HV3D/Innovation Center realization.

Emulating An Epic Win: Elements In A Successful Campaign

And, their success means that there is high hope to make this a repeatable process. So, we need to know how it all came together—because other such teams will want to emulate this campaign in the near(est) future. In New York City. In New York State. And, everywhere else in America…

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis & SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian Exchange With Press During The News Conference At The Inauguration Of The World's First "MakerBot Innovation Center" At SUNY New Paltz, 11 February 2014.

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis & SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian Exchange With Press During The News Conference At The Inauguration Of The World’s First “MakerBot Innovation Center” At SUNY New Paltz, 11 February 2014.

Leadership may be the key ingredient, but there are others of near-equal importance in the course of successful program action.

Early on, leaders and/or organizations need to seed the process with a significant resource contribution(s) to kick off the campaign. This input could be in cash, kind and/or connection-making. (These contributions are also the springboard for recruiting other “sponsors” to join the program—everyone wants the right people to come to the campaign “party,” they don’t want to be there alone and campaign-player aggregation gains momentum with each recruitment success.)  There needs to be a physical center of action and headquarters on-going. It helps mightily if that center is at, or involved with, a Higher Education Institution (HEI). For dissemination of results (e.g., business enhancement, workforce development, new enterprise formation, etc.), an Economic Development Organization (EDO) is also key.

The New Paltz Take-Away: Progress Process As A Pattern For ED Success

So, here’s what you need know about the process of building the SUNY New Paltz HV3D and subsequent Innovation Center in the Economic Development short-form—and who the players were and what they did:

During a more-or-less year of run-up (last half of 2012 and first half of 2013), the core team members (all locals)—SUNY New Paltz, Hudson River Ventures, Hudson Valley EDC & Central Hudson G&E—joined forces as a Team around a 3DP Economic Development-plus-plus play, came up with a game plan and executed it via a number of key actions. Here (not necessarily in this order) are some of their milestones:

Disruptive Opportunity Grasped.  The Team coalesces around the hottest driver in tech, manufacturing and entrepreneurship: 3DP.

Center of Action Formed.  During that year, the Team decided to create the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center (branded as HV3D: a name that underlines the 3DP in “Advanced”) at SUNY New Paltz.

Lead HEI Gets In.  Donald Christian, President of SUNY New Paltz, commits his institution to provide the physical venue for HV3D—and the greater goal of a relationship with MakerBot—and various innovative pedagogical goals around 3DP.

Art & Science Marry Up. Wisely, SUNY New Paltz decides that 3DP objectives are best served by aligning STE(A)M disciplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design & Math. Techreatives will rule in our Brave New (3DP) World. And, New Paltz has strong departments in both art and science. Daniel Freedman, Dean, School of Science & Engineering & Director of HV3D and Paul Kassel, Interim Dean, School of Fine & Performing Arts, at SUNY New Paltz start collaborating to support HV3d and the potential for a MakerBot Innovation Center on campus.

First Money Contributed.  Sean Eldridge, President of Hudson River Ventures, and regional utility Central Hudson become founders/benefactors of HV3D by contributing $500K in cash to the project.

EDO Networks Opportunities.  Larry Gottlieb, President and CEO of the Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation—the regional EDO—builds and brokers the relationship between SUNY New Paltz and MakerBot.

3DP Major-Player Commits. Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot, decides to partner with the Hudson Valley Team to open the first MakerBot Innovation Center anywhere in the world at SUNY New Paltz.

Other Institutions Join. Hudson River Ventures commits $500K of venture capital to help launch 3DP startups springing from the HV3D/Innovation Center program.

NY State Gets Involved. Mid-Hudson Regional Economic Development Council (MHREDC) makes the HV3D/Innovation Center program one of its top priorities for New York State funding (of a projected $1 million).

Milestones Made & Celebrated. In May of 2013, SUNY New Paltz launched the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center/HV3D; in August of 2013, SUNY New Paltz launched its 3DP-driven certificate program in Digital Design & Fabrication (another first); in December 2013, MHREDC secures $1 million in New York State economic development funds for the SUNY New Paltz 3DP programs; in February of 2014, SUNY New Paltz celebrates—along with its entire Collaborative Home-Team—the launch of the world’s first MakerBot Innovation Center.

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Larry Gottlieb (left), President & CEO of the Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation (HVEDC) and Daniel Freedman, Dean, School of Science & Engineering, & Director of HV3D at SUNY New Paltz, at the HVEDC/HV3D booth at the "3D Printshow NY," in NYC, 14 Feb 2014.

Larry Gottlieb (left), President & CEO of the Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation (HVEDC) and Daniel Freedman, Dean, School of Science & Engineering, & Director of HV3D at SUNY New Paltz, at the HVEDC/HV3D booth at the “3D Printshow NY,” in NYC, 14 Feb 2014.

There’s much more to this on-going New Paltz story. And, I’ll be back to share as I continue mining its rich vein. But, what counts right now is this explication of what they have already accomplished—and will going forward. Because their remarkable achievement is indeed an Epic Win—from which we can all learn and profit…

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

 

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The 3DP Education Marketplace (cont.): K-5 Conundrums, Middle-School Modes & Curricula Are Key

3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing/DigiFab Companies In Consumer, Professional & Industrial Sectors Of The 3DP Marketplace (Think MakerBot, 3D Systems, Autodesk, Etc.) Are All Pursuing The 3DP Education Marketplace: For Near-Term Tactical Positioning, Mid-Term Profits & Long-Term Mindshare—To Understand (And Gain By) The Trends, Look As Well To Other Signposts, Cynosures & Sub Rosa Phenoms…And Create Your Own Strategy Mash-Ups…

Blokify Empowers 3D Modeling For Kids with iPad Interfaces: a combo of structured finger-painting and Minecraft on iOS touchscreens, even K-5ers can grok this interface...

Blokify Empowers 3D Modeling For Kids with iPad Interfaces: a combo of structured finger-painting and Minecraft on iOS touchscreens, even K-5ers can grok this interface… (Pic Thx to Fabbaloo.com at World Maker Faire NYC, 21 September 2013!)

In my last four posts, I’ve considered “Edifying Enterprises,” Marketers-By-Education and Playroom Players. For your broader benefit, I’ve focused my commercial and commentator interest on MakerBot and 3D Systems—and actions and initiatives of those companies in the 3DP Education Marketplace. Commercial leaders’ positioning and directions can inform us of where resources are being invested—and where the market is likely to go.

At the same time, astute observers—and would-be leaders—among the readership here can also profitably look to other trend identifiers. These are the flares and fireworks one observes in the random-noise “night sky”—and wonders at…with commercial and common-good intent. Gather the dazzle and string your own constellations to light your way…

 

 K-5 Conundrums

How to engage really-young makers and empower their leap from LEGO to 3D digital modeling—and subsequent “making” of their own LEGO-like constructs on 3D Printers?

Until now, this early-tech-ed-via-3DP was a difficult problem for both parents and pedagogues. Low-end and simple 3D modeling tools—like Autodesk’s 123D Design—are still NOT simple enough for K-5ers. (This segment not big enough for you? Think about the “Double Nickel” crowd: those 55 and older. Untutored K-5ers AND 55ers are in about the same place with regards to digitech education needs (with an edge to the K-5ers!)…other players should “do” SUPER simple CAD software—and serve both market niches at once!)

Voila! Blokify!! Like Minecraft on a tablet with 3DP output, Blokify launched its iOS-based product in January. (Note to C-Suite Execs in Billund, Denmark: LEGO should buy New York City’s Blokify, if—for nothing else—than to recapture ground lost and opportunities frittered to cheeky Minecraft.)

Here’s another intriguing (would-be 3DP) teacher’s resource I ran across while researching this post. Check out “3D Printing in the Classroom” on the Classroom 2.0 site. The links contained in this blog stretch across K-12.

AND—least I forget—our own NYC3DP Summits September 2013 Roundtable on 3DP Ed Tech is available here. It is really an outstanding and educational discussion among some of the most important players in the NYC Ed Tech scene. “3DP & Kids” was convened on 25 September 2013 at LREI’s Elisabeth Irwin HS in the Village. The entire Roundtable is on video and you can access it from this Vlog interface above. Again: pan K-12 ideas across the 3DP spectrum…

 

Middle-School Modes

If K-5 is where we train the fingers, eyes and imaginations, then middle school is where we capture the hearts and minds—particularly for STEM and STE(A)M in high school, college and later life.

Rowan Driscoll, Middle School STEM Teacher in Oakland Public School System in Oakland, CA.

Rowan Driscoll, Middle School STEM Teacher in Oakland Public School System in Oakland, CA.

I’ve a son-in-law who teaches math and biology in a district middle school—that he helped to establish—in Oakland, California. Eighty-five percent of his students are recipients of free lunches. In other words, these are very disadvantaged kids. And, then you throw in English as a second language, chaotic home lives and a high percentage of “undocumentation.”

Rowan decided to switch from teaching STEM in high school in Oakland to doing similar work in middle school. This because he really DOES believe that “hearts and minds” are channeled into STEM success in middle school. After that, STEM/STE(A)M-susceptible/smitten kids can be too easily lost to the very many pressures and distractions of high school and the clamor of life thereafter.

Ro changed his own career track because he feels it IS essential to assure that as many kids as possible are exposed to—and seduced by—the arts and beauties of science.

My STEM-inspiring son-i-l presents life possibilities to his many down-side students. The kind of tech-driven fantasies-come-true that his Middle Schoolers see all around the Bay Area—BUT as through a glass darkly—from San Francisco’s SOMA to Silicon Valley to the East Bay and Berkeley.

He presents tangible examples of tech success—in and out of school. His science labs teach sci-tech knowledge demonstrated (unto lab-tech chops: want a job that will pay for your college tuition?), field trips are rich because the hosting tech-company campuses are fairy lands of science cum success and this man himself—in his presence—sets high personal, athletic and academic standards for emulation (and hope) among his students.

 

Curricula Are Key

"Young Makers" Pavilion at World Maker Faire New York, NYSCI, Queens, NY, Saturday, 21 Sept 13.

“Young Makers” Pavilion at World Maker Faire New York, NYSCI, Queens, NY, Saturday, 21 Sept 13.

3D Printing is just a machine-driven construct until someone creates something. And, creativity is an exquisite form of problem-solving. Applying knowledge, artistic inquiry and critical thinking to the real world is what 3DP can be all about.

I regularly talk about the inherent advantage that New York City—and especially Brooklyn—has in the 3DP revolution. I’ve even taken to calling our NeoBrooklyn “hybrid hipster” the Techreative. This reflects his or her dual—and synergistic—capabilities in digital technology AND analog art and design. (Coming back to the acronym STE(A)M: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design & Math.)

In 3DP, both technology and creativity add to the mix of 3D-Print “making.”

My son-in-law often employes the curriculum concepts known as Project-Based Learning (PBL). In essence, learning by doing. Don’t learn the abstract precepts first; discover, uncover, develop them as you progress through your PBL “build plan.” A kind of high-tech apprenticeship with lots of hands-on/minds-on manipulation of atoms—as much or more than digits.

PBL is a great teaching structure for successful 3D-printing curricula—it, too, is problem-solving in the round.

So, the curricula ARE key—in succeeding in the 3DP Education Market. And the primary alliances to be made are with the teachers—who first must be taught! That 3DP industry player who 3DP-empowers the teachers will win their mindshare—and allegiance going forward—in the marketplace battle to win commercially via Marketing-By-Education.

PBL is just one structure to transform the 3D Printer into a teaching tool unparalleled. Many educators and entrepreneurs will be focused on creating new and even-more effective curricula to take advantage of the newest Edu-Tech Tool, the 3D Printer.

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

 

 

 

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Dueling 3DP “Education-Marketing” Strategies: How MakerBot & 3D Systems are Duking It Out In Schools & Playrooms To Gain Longterm Marketplace Dominance

 Two Of The Major Players In 3D Printing Are BOTH Focused On Imprinting Their Brands On Malleable “Hearts & Minds” In The Education Ecosystem; MakerBot & 3D Systems Each Strive To School Politicians, Parents, Administrators, Teachers & Students With Their Logo’d Solutions In Different Niches Of The Education Timeline—In Or Out Of The Classroom.

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis & SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian Exchange With Press During The News Conference At The Inauguration Of The World's First "MakerBot Innovation Center" At SUNY New Paltz, 11 February 2014.

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis & SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian Exchange With Press During The News Conference At The Inauguration Of The World’s First “MakerBot Innovation Center” At SUNY New Paltz, 11 February 2014.

In the fevered world of “go-go” 3DP, no one can accuse MakerBot or 3D Systems of thinking short-term. Instead of next quarter, the two publicly held contenders seem intent on capturing stock-boosting positions in the next decade. Payback in the education market requires a parental perspective. Kids and market share may both grow at about the same pace. BUT, once you’ve got some height and stature, you’re unlikely to lose it.

MakerBot is concentrating on older scholars. In November of 2013, it rolled out the “MakerBot Academy” plan. The Academy’s goal is to put a MakerBot desktop 3D Printer “in every school in America.” (For kickoff purposes, the Academy seems to be focusing first on high schools.) Initial big name partners in the initiative are America Makes, DonorsChoose.org and Autodesk.

On 6 February the company announced the “MakerBot Innovation Center” plan to partner with universities (AND businesses) with in-college “makerspaces” writ large as labs. Bre Pettis, CEO, actually helped cut the ribbon on the first “Innovation Center” at SUNY New Paltz campus on 11 February.

Here are some of my MakerBot tweets that present additional views and linked information about these announcements and events:

MAKERBOT DEBUTS WINNING #MARKETING-BY-#EDUCATION STRATEGY! @Makerbot-The #Apple of #3DPrinting-grabs #Edu MindShare! http://ow.ly/3hfvzP 

MAKERBOT RE-PRINTS #3DP #MARKETING? C My Post 4 @MakerBot‘s “Edifying Entrprz” Strategy: Makerbot Innov Ctr Debuts! http://ow.ly/3hhpSt 

@MAKERBOT FOSTERS 21st C. eCOTTAGE #INDUSTRY? Debuts #Innovation Centers 2 Gain From #3DP=#Startups=Jobs! C My Post: http://ow.ly/3hoJ1C 

 

Avi Reichental (left), President & CEO of 3D Systems Corporation, teaches 3DP'd guitar "making" at a trade show.

Avi Reichental (left), President & CEO of 3D Systems Corporation, teaches 3DP’d guitar “making” at a trade show.

3D Systems Corporation seems focused—at least to start—on the younger set. Earlier this month, 3D Systems announced it would “play” with toy-maker Hasbro to create new 3DP games and toys for children. A few days later, 3D Systems announced that it had purchased Digital Playspaces to build on its “create & make” environments for 3DP in the playroom. (This all atop the acquisition of 3D toy modeling, collectibles and entertainment-services company Gentle Giant in January.)

Here are some of my 3D Systems’ tweets that present additional perspective and  linked information:

@3DSYSTEMSCORP (#3DP) PLAYS W/HASBRO? @MakerBot Tgts HS & Unis; DDD 2 Transform(er) Toys: DIY Printables 4 CHILDREN! http://ow.ly/3hn3eY 

@3DSYSTEMSCORP REPRINTS PLAYROOM? Post Hasbro Deal, DDD Buys Digital Playspace 4 its #3DP “Create-&-Make Experience!” http://ow.ly/3htoVf 

+++

Here are some ancillary topics we’re going to touch on—in this and future posts—around the 3DP Education Marketplace:

  • Playroom Play
  • K-5 Conundrums
  • Middle-School Mode
  • Curricula is Key and teaching the teachers is even Key-er.
  • Afterschool Arcadia
  • LEGO
  • Mobile Model

Playroom Play—

3D Systems is certainly focused on this target market. You can tell when the company is serious about a niche—because Avi starts buying up players in the segment. (See my tweet above about Digital Playspace.) Apple tea-leaf readers (not to mix our organic metaphors) try to track the Jobsian Enigma’s trajectory by is acquisitions—tallying in at over 20 smallish firms with distinct tech in the last 15 months.

DDD “buys” over the last two years plus must now number somewhere in the mid-40s. It’s difficult to keep up with the “3DP IP Vacuum” that is 3D Systems. Still—commentator criticisms aside—it’s also hard to fault this strategy. Especially, if you have the resources (appreciating stock!)—AND can effectively absorb the new tech, foreign biz cultures and key players (the AcquiHire!) purchased.

And, “3DP Toys?” Many of today’s super-low-end 3D printers already look and feel like toys. (Some of DDD’s “Cube” consumer products could be so accused…) BUT, their output quality, speed and software UX are well beyond what was available from mid-range machines just a few years ago. The Hasbro partnership is a great step in an entree process of learning from the topic-leader.

This toy deal is a version of what I might call the “LEGO Transform.” Once upon a time (the 90s!), LEGO was down on its junior kit-builder’s luck. (Yeah, I know, it’s hard to remember such an unLEGO circumstance…) Then—desperate measures for desperate times—LEGO did its first “Theme License.” And, LEGO StarWars was released in 1999. Shazam! The company went from offering construction toys to presenting fabulation toys.

The "LEGO Transform"---From Construction To Fabulation: Some LEGO Star Wars Characters, Many Stories...

The “LEGO Transform”—From Construction To Fabulation: Some LEGO Star Wars Characters, Many Stories…

Sure, you could build things as before—but now you had ready-made script, plot-lines, vehicles, stage sets, costumes, personae dramatis AND your playmates already knew the stories, too.

LEGO has never looked back and now its a Theme-License juggernaut. (What would that “kit” look like? The LEGO Movie!)

3D Systems may be onto a similar story-arc with its Hasbro partnership. Sure, 3D printers build things…just like LEGOs. But, will 3DP really take off in the toy market when Cube printers can easily print—and modify—toys, games and stories from Hasbro’s library of successes?! AND, yes, one of those Hasbro mega-hit toy ecosystems is “Transformers!”

+++

More to talk about in the ancillary topics mode around MakerBot, 3D Systems Corp. and the Education Market.

So, C’mon Back!

LAND

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“3DP=STARTUPS=JOBS”—21st C. eCottage Industries Are Launching From 3D Printers On Kitchen Tables, In Dorm Rooms & On Garage Benches…AND MakerBot Is Strategizing Means To Assure Those Startups Build On Its Brand!

MakerBot—The Brooklyn-Based Innovator In Desktop 3D Printing Equipment—Is Rapidly Pursuing Its Goal Of Parallel Innovation In The Way It Promotes It Products Commercially Via “Marketing-By-Education…”

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis & SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian Exchange With Press During The News Conference At The Inauguration Of The World's First "MakerBot Innovation Center" At SUNY New Paltz, 11 February 2014.

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis & SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian Exchange With Press During The News Conference At The Inauguration Of The World’s First “MakerBot Innovation Center” At SUNY New Paltz, 11 February 2014.

On Tuesday, 11 February, MakerBot—what I call “The Edifying Enterprise”—continued its drive to dominate the 3DP marketplace by implementing another milestone in its Marketing-By-Education campaign. MakerBot’s CEO Bre Pettis helped cut the ribbon on the world’s first “MakerBot Innovation Center” at SUNY New Paltz, a New York State University in the Hudson Valley two hours north of the City…

3DP is the 4th Disruptor! In order of debut, these four landmarks of our Digital Age are: (1) PC; (2) Internet; (3) Social Media; (4) 3DP. Our 4th Disruptor is really about atoms not bits. Atoms make things; digits make thoughts. Disruptors (1) thru (3) are Digital; 3DP is Neo-Analog! Thus, the 3DP Revolution is fundamentally different from the first three disruptions of the last 40 years at the beginning of our Digital Age. Our Fourth Disruptor promises to help re-industrialize and rejuvenate American manufacturing—by “new-shoring” it IN the United States.

MakerBot launched its first ”MakerBot Innovation Center” at a university. BUT, the company’s corporate goals are just as much about the “now!” betterment of private industry—and perhaps more so. In the world of business, MakerBot seeks to employ its 3DP means to enhance hyper-productive knowledge, instruments of innovation and change-making techniques.

One Rack of MakerBot Equipment & Printing Filament at the World's First "MakerBot Innovation Center" Debut Ceremony at SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014

One Rack of MakerBot Equipment (Of 30-Plus Machines) & Reels Of Printing Filament at the World’s First “MakerBot Innovation Center” & Its Debut Ceremony at SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014

In the strategic overview, MakerBot has a greater stake in the commercial marketplace than the educational. Businesses—startups and ramp-ups—can provide quicker ROI (with equipment purchases tomorrow). Educational institutions, conversely, will take longer to produce a return on the medium and long bureaucratic marketing and sales—of MakerBot Academies and Innovation Centers to high schools and colleges respectively.

Seeking to buttress educational institutions and the “making” careers of future graduates is strategically important to MakerBot. After all: hearts and minds make buying decisions. And, brand loyalty—so engendered—could make for lifetime-customers. It’s just that MakerBot will have to strike the right balance between the different ROI profiles of these two market segments. The quick and mercurial of business and the long-term buying profile of educational institutions.

Nancy Zimpher, Chancellor of the State University of New York, Joins The Public Ribbon-Cutting By Video Presentation At The "MakerBot Innovation Center" Debut, SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014.

Nancy Zimpher, Chancellor of the State University of New York, Joins The Public Ribbon-Cutting By Video Presentation At The “MakerBot Innovation Center” Debut, SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014.

MakerBot’s official media releases around the debut of the Innovation Center doesn’t specifically tout jobs as an “output” of its Centers” initiative. But, job-generation is implicit in the message the company is delivering to the marketplace.

(Note to Bre: government at every level—hamlet to Whitehouse—is seeking the Holy Grail of economic development: Job-Gen. You might as well grab this explicit position as well—politicians everywhere will love you for it AND do your marketing for you! The Chancellor of the SUNY system stated explicitly that your Center “…exemplifies the power of innovative public/private partnerships… directly connecting education, advanced technology and workforce development…”)

When we kicked off our 3DP Media startup in May of 2013, we showcased “3DP=Jobs” as one of our official mantras. And, we still do! The longform of this commercial chant is ”3DP=Startups & Ramp-Ups=Jobs.” As we state in this post’s headline, 3DP’s creative making—by amateur and professional Techreatives—is the well-spring for our 21st Century’s eCottage Industries.

And, the best job-making startups will probably arise from totally naive, newbie makers—who don’t know enough to know what can’t be done. Those who can restart their creativity in the now-software and hardware modulated “playrooms” of a (virtual) childhood recaptured—where multi-media mashups, serial start-overs, laughing lunacies and sheer delight in the manipulation of 3D fun—are likely to be the most successful of the (3DP-empowered) entrepreneurs of our national makeover.

Sean Eldridge, President of Hudson River Ventures & a Founder/Benefactor of the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center at SUNY New Paltz, exchanges with Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot, and key-noter at the the Grand Opening Celebration at the "MakerBot Innovation Center" at SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014.

Sean Eldridge, President of Hudson River Ventures & a Founder/Benefactor of the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center at SUNY New Paltz, exchanges with Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot, and keynoter at the the Grand Opening Celebration at the “MakerBot Innovation Center” at SUNY New Paltz, 11 Feb 2014.

Bre Pettis—having launched his college-based version of the “MakerBot Innovation Center”—must now figure out how to integrate a private-business version of the “Center” into the marketplace. Employing easily identified collaborators at educational institutions—to act as easy on-ramps, academic conduits and mentored path-finders—is going to be difficult enough to achieve at scale. JUST for the institution’s student population. (AND, scaling up the MakerBot Centers’ initiative—on campuses and off—in a commercial-impacting hurry is key to staying ahead of the 3DP competition.)

One solution to this dilemma—of scaling and extending the concept and reality of Innovation Centers out into each local-business community nationwide—is to partner and collaborate with ALL the hyper-local players as a TEAM of community interests.

What I’ve already started to call the Collaborative Home-Team in posts such as these.

Signage at the MakerBot Innovation Center Opening Ceremony, 11 February 2014, SUNY New Paltz, showing some of the Team of local collaborators who helped realize this break-through project.

Signage at the MakerBot Innovation Center Opening Ceremony, 11 February 2014, SUNY New Paltz, showing some of the Team of local collaborators who helped realize this break-through project.

In innovative Re-Industrialization Initiatives like this “MakerBot Center” play, there are natural allies to be recruited and conjoined into an effective local Team. The first-ever “MakerBot Innovation Center” has proved that such make-it-happen, geography-connected Teams CAN be coalesced into effective engines of common-interest, support and change. Here is my current list of possible-player categories—from which to recruit—to form such community common-good groups:

  1. Economic Development Organizations (e.g., Chambers, econ-dev corps, public/private partnerships, biz-improvement districts, etc.);
  2. Education institutions (K-12 through Graduate);
  3. Child-focused organizations outside school-systems (after-school, clubs, Ys, etc.);
  4. Local library systems;
  5. Community Digi/Fab-engined “makers,” tinkerers and artisans of all kinds;
  6. Governments and public agencies & authorities at every level;
  7. The local manufacturing and small-business base;
  8. Institutions with local or regional constituencies (e.g., banks, utilities, clubs); &
  9. Local or regional venture-capital firms.

These organizations have common and commonweal interests that they can naturally aggregate to advance change-agents, populations, communities, industries and more. The catalyst can be win/win initiatives like “MakerBot Innovation Centers.” BUT, the on-driving engine must be—at the least—an engaged and energetic leader (or cadre of true believers) with vision and drive to help bring such Teams together for both commerce and common-good.

Will YOU serve?!!

C’mon Back!

LAND

OBTW: 3D Systems Corp. and Hasbro Toys today announced a partnership to—as The Guardian‘s headline put it—”make 3D printing child’s play!” To quote their release, the companies are working together to “co-develop and commercialize innovative play printers and platforms later this year.” I guess Avi Reichental, 3D Systems’ President & CEO, decided to out-flank Bre by going even further down  life’s food-chain—to grab “Child-Share” before MakerBot gets to “hearts & minds” in schools and colleges?! Here’s my tweet of earlier today on the topic:

@3DSYSTEMSCORP (#3DP) PLAYS W/HASBRO? @MakerBot Tgts HS & Unis; DDD 2 Transform(er) Toys: DIY Printables 4 CHILDREN! http://ow.ly/3hn3eY 

 

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