3DP4E Producing (Physical! Printed!! Non-3DP’d!!!) Poster Series To Showcase 3DP…

In the whiteout of our 3D-Printing “TMI” blizzard, all of us are looking for the hand-raised letterpress signals against the featureless noise of petabyte-gray backgrounds.

So, if you’re in the business of galvanizing 3DP awareness, exciting attention, educating ignorance and focusing the white-hot beam of change through the fog of the future, how would YOU illuminate the way forward for our Additive Manufacturing industry?

3DP4E's "3DP'd Fashion" Poster: first in a series of traditionally printed, four-color, frame-able posters celebrating the new worlds of 3D Printing as "collectable" art.

3DP4E’s “3DP’d Fashion” Poster: first in a series of traditionally printed, four-color, frame-able posters celebrating the new worlds of 3D Printing as “collectable” art.

Well, you might lead by emulating 3DP4E.com (“3D Printing For Everyone”) of New York City. (The folks who just brought you “3D Printing and Digital Fabrication Resource eBook” [on which I’ve reported here on 3DPI] and also presents a Beginner’s Guide online…among other curated, categorized and creative Web-based paths to 3DP knowledge). You’d print up a poster—yep, four-color inks on heavy, clay-coated paper. A wall-mounted statement: tangible, tactile, tackable…and rare. Decidedly—and delightfully—NOT digital.

That is by deploying the counterintuitive, showcasing the retro and shining the brass of steampunk sensibility for your geek/glam techreative-audience members. (I consider this last to be another synonym for Brooklynites in 3DP…) And, that other—often dumbfounded—multitude that diligently resists the doom of playing eternal catch-up with the accelerating leading edge. These are the folks who need 3DP knowledge most: the clients and customers and deep community a-building via 3DP4E interest and leadership.

This new company—as I’ve reported—“has decided to make it easier for 3DP newbies and the uninitiated (a VERY large population of wannabes) to access the knowledge bases of our booming 3DP industry.”

3DP4E's Logo Suite--3D Printing Around The World?

3DP4E’s Logo Suite–3D Printing Around The World?

As part of its mission, 3DP4E has decided to start showcasing the work of innovative 3DP-driven artists, designers and creative makers in different disciplines by—in effect—putting “group shows” on large-scale printed posters. 3DP4E intends to cycle through most important current 3DP segments via spotlighting the most important players—starting with Fashion. (Appropriate for 3DP4E’s hometown: one of the planet’s most important clusters of the worldwide Fashion industry.)

As 3DP4E describes it: “The first in…[our poster] series focuses on the innovative work done in the Fashion world, and features designers such as Francis Bitonti, Catherine Wales and Nervous Systems. These designers push the boundaries of digital fabrication within the world of fashion.”

Ron Rose, CEO of 3DP4E.

Ron Rose, CEO of 3DP4E.

“These posters are designed to look good in Makerspaces and Fabrication Labs, and to look beautiful as framed art in one’s home,” says Ron Rose, the CEO of 3DP4E. “Stay tuned for next poster in our series—3D Art.”

Perhaps as an antidote to accusations of quixotic Luddite leanings, poster-maker 3DP4E has positioned the poster itself as a front end to the startup’s larger mission as “a dynamic [3DP] information hub.” A QR Code printed on the poster enables viewers to link to “a dedicated page on 3DP4E’s website with pictures, descriptions, videos and articles on the designs.” Plus, anyone intrigued by the company’s choice of 3DP-empowered designers can learn more about their work on 3DP4E’S 3DP Fashion poster by going to: www.3dp4e.com/posters/3d-fashion.

Some of the 3DP4E Team in action at their Manhattan offices: (from left) Ron Rose, Larry Adames & Matt Manuele.

Some of the 3DP4E Team in action at their Manhattan offices: (from left) Ron Rose, Larry Adames & Matt Manuele.

Want to get your own look at 3DP4E’s “3DP’d Fashion” poster? Or, claim one for free? Attend World Maker Faire New York 2014 on September 20th and 21st and visit 3DP4E’s booth. The startup will be giving away posters to the first 100 people dropping by on the Faire’s Saturday and Sunday.

Going to miss the Faire? 3DP4E’s first poster is also available as a free download on its site and can be accessed directly at: www.3dp4e.com/posters. 

C’mon Back!

LAND

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Email, HOME, NY3DPWeek, Views | Leave a comment

From Prototype To Production: An Innovative, 3DP Trade Show Gets Down To Industrial-Manufacturing Business In New York City…

Our 3DP industry-segment is attracting more and more trade events. Don’t bother wondering about the growth and directions of 3D Printing interest and impact. Just take a look (in New York City) at the number and variety of new 3DP-focused events founded or staged right here in the last year or so. AND—more importantly—going forward:

Panel: Cross-Industry Panel at "Additive Manufacturing Production Application Initiative 2014" -- Left to Right: Piet Meijs, Associate Partner, Rietveld Architects; Pete Stephens, Dir of Program Management, Local Motors; Sarah Sclarsic, Dir of Business, Modern Meadow; Ralph Resnick, Pres & Exec Dir,  National Center for Defense Manufacturing & Machining (NCDMM) & Founding Director, America Makes

Panel: Cross-Industry Panel at “Additive Manufacturing Production Application Initiative 2014″ — Left to Right: Piet Meijs, Associate Partner, Rietveld Architects; Pete Stephens, Dir of Program Management, Local Motors; Sarah Sclarsic, Dir of Business, Modern Meadow; Ralph Resnick, Pres & Exec Dir, National Center for Defense Manufacturing & Machining (NCDMM) & Founding Director, America Makes

Now, New York City may be slightly ahead of the 3DP adoption curve. But, let me suggest that these kinds of 3DP-driven commercial trade events are going to start showing up in cities and towns and communities and institutions all over the globe.

One reason 3DP-focused, physical, in-person events—of all kinds—will prosper and grow is that our industry converts ethereal digits to touchable objects: thoughts to things, as I like to say. You need to be there to “grasp”—literally and physically—the 3DP’d “goods.” And, the good hands of those real people who are attending the event with you. Humans are gregarious. We herd. We like to associate with one another. And—at trade events—we also tend to make commercial relationships. (Another synonym for doing business…)

Trade shows are those places where corporate and organizational hierarchies become intentional fluid and more permeable—the better to interface with the “outside” world. The world into which— after all—businesses are trying to sell! The socially ept and apt human can work a trade show for all kinds of commercial advantages and advancements. Especially, if s/he actually likes people!

Trade show producers only jump on a hot-topic when they’re sure they can profit from a building and burgeoning community of (generally to start) the puzzled and/or the passionate. (Just consider New York-based Mecklermedia’s expansion of their Inside 3D Printing Conferences and Expos to nine events worldwide—from one in NYC in 2013—in the remainder of 2014 and the first half of 2015. Not to be outdone, 3D Printshow of the UK also has nine 3D printing events scheduled in the next year. That’s from one in 2012. {The 3D Printshow London is going on 4 through 6 September—as I write.})

If trade show activity is a leading indicator of 3DP-sector promise and prospect—and I think it is—here’s another marker of our industry’s certain success.

Last week [26-28 August 2014], one of the conferences I listed above— the Additive Manufacturing Production Application Initiative 2014 (AMPAI)—debuted in Mid-Town Manhattan. AMPAI proved to be (for a first-time 3DP event) a ”below the radar” gem of a trade show.

Proving the unfortunate obscurity of this event was that—according to on-the-scene show-staff—AMPAI had only 80 paid attendees. (As usual—if you consider a new trade event to be a kind of ”startup”—effective marketing is the biggest need such an entrepreneurial enterprise needs…)

[With new-show marketing in mind---here’s a note to this show’s producers at American Business Conferences. Dear Friends, please proactively consider changing the name of your ”AMAPI” event. ”Additive Manufacturing”---despite the ”rightness” of the phrase---is NOT going to win the battle of public branding, media positioning and meme virality. ”Production Application Initiative” doesn’t even tell your fellow insiders much. (And, that’s without discussing the lead-balloon nature of a string of three to five-syllable nouns and adjectives…) I think your subtitle---"Proactively Taking 3D Printing From Prototype To Production"---is much closer to the mark for your mostly industrial community. That said, I would also encourage you to go all the way to ”3DP”---and help take the lead in buttressing that winning neologism as part of your event branding. Yours, LG.

PS. As the best example of effective rebranding in a closely related circumstance, see ”America Makes” (from the previous ”National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute”). Ralph Resnick, Founding Director, knew what he was doing when he transformed a boring and bland moniker into a sub-title for an exciting, colorful action statement---with a compelling new logotype to boot.]

The explosive growth in our segment’s shows keeps my colleagues at 3DPI editorial-management working hard to learn about new 3DP trade events. [We use online tools, too, such as ”3D Printing Trade Shows”---BUT no organization is catching them all…](Most PR and marketing folks for a new 3DP show know that they need to tell 3DPI all about it—in hopes of our professional coverage!) Then, 3DPI HQ alerts me—and the other writers on the 3DPI Team—to ”local” 3DP events of worth in our individual geographic-catchment area. Otherwise, I might have missed this rich conference altogether.

In the foment and ferment of 3DP’s acceleration, we apply an event-discovery process. This is because even some of the most appropriate local, regional or nationally focused journos don’t necessarily show up on the ”Must Invite List” of new, inexperienced and/or out-of-town show developers and producers. Especially in a hyper-growth business (such as 3DP) with an influx of ”newbies”—even among the PR professionals trying to support new commercial initiatives in the sector.

The AMPAI show was heavily weighted to an industrial manufacturing audience. Representative job titles included such terms as Engineering, Advanced Manufacturing, Technology, Materials, R&D, Design, Innovation, Rapid Prototyping, etc. At the round-tables in the main conference room were attendees from 3M, Adidas, Airbus, Alcoa, Bayer, Boeing, Johnson & Johnson, Nike, PPG, LEGO, Raytheon, Xerox and more. Many of these kinds of manufacturing-industry companies were the original early-adopters of 3DP—for rapid prototyping and reverse engineering—when the tech was first introduced 30 years ago.

The tone of the AMPAI show was serious. It was as if the sponsors were saying ”Nothing frivolous here. None of that desktop consumer stuff. You can bank on our considered industrial-grade choices in topics, presentations and players!”

The key to the AMPAI vision was the sub-title phrase: ”…From Prototype To Production. Although it wasn’t really emphasized in the show’s explanatory (physical or digital) materials, I think there are two parts to that “production” objective that makes up the manufacturing “holy grail” for 3DP—and this new event’s ultimate dual-focus.

That two-part production is—first—direct to end-use. By this, I mean printing an object that is NOT a prototype or part of a mold-making process or an extruding fixture. But, a 3DP’d object that takes its place in a final application with little or no additional processing. Think: a titanium fan-jet blade with innovative internal cooling channels that could only be manufactured via 3DP.

The second part of my two-part industrial production view is volume. That is 3D printing in quantity. Additive mass manufacturing. Scalable mass customization. Reliability and repeatability via a “printer farm.” The first organization to scale from a run of 1 to a 1,000—with some appropriate amalgam of customer-pleasing quality, hardware/software synergies, hybridized materials and quantum-slashed build-times—wins “first mover” dominance. And, the Neo-Henry Ford Award for innovating the 21st C. industrial-manufacturing equivalent of the moving assembly line.

From the AMPAI ”literature,” here is their key paragraph [bolding is theirs]:

”From a technical perspective, additive manufacturing has reached a tipping point where the technology is maturing but big changes to software, applications and scale are expected to happen any moment. As end users are trying to take additive manufacturing one step further and apply it to production, they need to know how to reduce costs while improving quality, both through materials and equipment optimization, as well as to identify the right applications for the technology.”

Note that AMPAI was levying a (standard full-price) $2,500 fee for three days of conference and workshop. First, a workshop on Day One (hands-on 3DP equipment at a separate site; i.e., an NYC 3DP-retail venue) and two full days of conference sessions, Days Two and Three. Or, $1,800 for just the two conference days. (They also offered “Super Early Bird” and “Early Bird” discounts).

Clearly, the promoters of AMPAI were targeting the deep pockets of enterprise, industrial and professional attendees.

The two days of sessions totaled 19 different presentations. Day Two was 11 individual-speaker presentations. Day Three was a panel, two-tracks of breakout sessions in the AM and one & two speaker presentations in the PM.

For your ”deeper dive” into this rich and instructional 3DP environment, here’s a link to the entire AMPAI event directory. And—for better understanding of our booming industry—it’s useful to see how a purpose-built, contemporaneous, NYC-venued, AM/3DP conference event was structured, talent-positioned and charged for.

There will be more trade events like this—as vertical segments of 3DP take more integrated form…and fly!

C’mon Back!

LAND

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Email, HOME, NY3DPWeek, Views | Leave a comment

3DP4E(veryone!) Delivers 3DP Knowledge-Resources 4 E(veryone!) 4 Free 2 Educ8 ALL

3DP is still a mystery to most people. They struggle to visualize the 3D Z-axis rising up out of the 2D of X-axis and Y-axis. And, the industry hasn’t been particularly effective at explaining itself. So—NOW—voila: the “3D Printing and Digital Fabrication Resource eBook!”

3DP4E's Logo Suite--3D Printing Around The World?

3DP4E’s Logo Suite–3D Printing Around The World?

And, you—the insider—thought Fabbaloo and 3ders were the 3DP sources of choice for these kinds of 3DP info-compendia…??

We’re in a new industry. (Well, okay, it’s over 30 years old…but, 3DP still didn’t get any respect—if you weren’t into rapid prototyping or reverse engineering—until the advent of the affordable and effective desktop 3D printer approximately five years ago: thank you, MakerBot.) As a result, the entire industrial segment is still relatively thin on the ground. (E.g., only two pure-play, broad-spectrum, 3D printer manufacturers are “in” the 3DP business as publicly held firms: 3D Systems Corporation and Stratasys Ltd.—this last actually owns MakerBot Industries of Brooklyn.) So, new blood—new players with innovative ideas—is welcome.

Now—because 3DP is so novel to so many—a new player here in New York City, 3DP4E (or “3D Printing For Everyone”) has decided to make it easier for 3DP newbies and the uninitiated (a VERY large population of wannabes) to access the knowledge bases of our booming 3DP industry.

(Besides 3DP4E’s new Resource eBook—a stand-alone PDF package—its beautifully designed Web site with a high-styled AND effective UX {User Experience} presents a Beginner’s Guide online…among many, many other curated and categorized, Web-based paths to 3DP knowledge.)

In particular, 3DP4E is interested to empower schools, enable teachers and educate students around 3DP and Digital Fabrication. (If we were to start all over from the beginning of 3D Printing, we would want to use this last term—“Digital Fabrication”—as this is really the most accurate and inclusive term of art. BUT, “3D Printing”—soon to be supplanted by “3DP”—has won the mindshare of various communities at large and is now the “public brand” of choice. No use arguing with memes…)

Ron Rose, CEO of 3DP4E.

Ron Rose, CEO of 3DP4E.

Ron Rose—a successful businessman and entrepreneur in an entirely different field—has (like so many others) been bitten by the 3DP bug. Building on his passion—and certainty in 3DP’s beckoning future—Ron launched 3DP4E LLC on January 1, 2014.

CEO Rose’s all-inclusive company mission/profile/goal statement reads: “3DP4E will strive to empower through design, technology and entrepreneurism. Our website is designed to be a comprehensive resource for the 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication Community, with an emphasis on education and community. Our primary goal is to bring 3D Printing and Digital Fabrication to schools, museums and libraries.”

With the release—at the end of last week—of the free “3D Printing and Digital Fabrication Resource eBook,” 3DP4E has taken a giant stride toward opening 3DP knowledge-accessibility to all and sundry. The eBook was authored by the company’s Chief Engineer Ajay Chandrashekar—a nuclear engineer by trade. (Yes, 3DP tends to seduce everyone…)

In its eBook, 3DP4E has chosen to research, curate, enhance and present the diverse streams of data that already exist in our worldwide 3DP ecosystem. Employing the ethos of Open Source, Mr. Chandrashekar compiled information from prominent 3DP Web sites. (3DP4E freely acknowledges the contributions of Fabbaloo and 3ders, each of whom “provided a brilliant list for open source, many of which are included in this eBook.”) And, then delivers 3DP knowledge to those who need it most.

Some of the 3DP4E Team in action at their Manhattan offices: (from left) Ron Rose, Larry Adames & Matt Manuele.

Some of the 3DP4E Team in action at their Manhattan offices: (from left) Ron Rose, Larry Adames & Matt Manuele.

Here’s how 3DP4E Communications Director Noah Waldman describes the company’s community of interest: “Our target audience is in the name: 3D Printing for ‘Everyone.’ Primarily, this book is for the people—without much experience—[who are] first looking to start learning about 3D printing. To that end, one of our favorite pages in the book is the “Free 3D Modeling Software” page. We feel it’s a great place for newcomers to really get hands on experience with working in three dimensions. But, we hope this book is also useful to professionals—who might be looking for new and better tools to help them get the most out of 3D printing.”

The primary innovations of “3D Printing and Digital Fabrication Resource eBook”—and the reason the effort is new and noteworthy—are several in number. They include: (1) multi-source curation; (2) clean, inviting and accessible product design; (3) free, easily available and conveniently packaged (PDF) content; and (4) a pledge to “ever-green” evolution of the subject matter. This last is key to the on-going usefulness of 3DP4E’s eBook—as nothing in tech is changing as fast as 3DP.

3DP4E is positioned to keep its eBook up-to-speed, up-to-date and regularly enhanced—because the company is really a media house covering the widest spectrum of 3DP interests. One side of the house informs the other.

3DP4E is making accessible 3DP knowledge its core deliverable. Those joining the swelling 3DP parade—present and prospective—should look forward to 3DP4E’s flag flying high as a leader to follow toward 3DP effectiveness. And, their next great 3DP’d object…thoughts to things…

C’mon Back!

LAND

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Posted in Email, HOME, NY3DPWeek, Views | Leave a comment